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* bug#68878: [PATCH] Fix typos throughout codebase.
@ 2024-02-01 19:32 Morgan Smith
  0 siblings, 0 replies; only message in thread
From: Morgan Smith @ 2024-02-01 19:32 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 68878; +Cc: Morgan Smith

* NEWS:
* doc/ref/api-control.texi:
* doc/ref/api-data.texi:
* doc/ref/api-debug.texi:
* doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi:
* doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi:
* doc/ref/api-foreign.texi:
* doc/ref/api-i18n.texi:
* doc/ref/api-io.texi:
* doc/ref/api-languages.texi:
* doc/ref/api-macros.texi:
* doc/ref/api-memory.texi:
* doc/ref/api-modules.texi:
* doc/ref/api-options.texi:
* doc/ref/api-peg.texi:
* doc/ref/api-procedures.texi:
* doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi:
* doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi:
* doc/ref/api-utility.texi:
* doc/ref/expect.texi:
* doc/ref/goops.texi:
* doc/ref/misc-modules.texi:
* doc/ref/posix.texi:
* doc/ref/repl-modules.texi:
* doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi:
* doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi:
* doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi:
* gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch:
* gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch:
* gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch:
* lib/alloca.in.h:
* lib/c-ctype.h:
* lib/malloca.h:
* lib/nstrftime.c:
* lib/verify.h:
* lib/xalloc-oversized.h:
* libguile/gc.h:
* libguile/ioext.c:
* libguile/list.c:
* libguile/options.c:
* libguile/posix.c:
* libguile/threads.c:
* module/ice-9/boot-9.scm:
* module/ice-9/optargs.scm:
* module/ice-9/ports.scm:
* module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm:
* module/ice-9/psyntax.scm:
* module/language/elisp/parser.scm:
* module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm:
* module/srfi/srfi-37.scm:
* module/srfi/srfi-43.scm:
* module/statprof.scm:
* module/texinfo/reflection.scm:
* test-suite/tests/eval.test:
* test-suite/tests/fluids.test:
Fix typos.
---
 NEWS                                         |   2 +-
 doc/ref/api-control.texi                     |  20 +--
 doc/ref/api-data.texi                        | 147 ++++++++++---------
 doc/ref/api-debug.texi                       |  82 +++++------
 doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi                  |   2 +-
 doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi                  |  30 ++--
 doc/ref/api-foreign.texi                     |  18 +--
 doc/ref/api-i18n.texi                        |  12 +-
 doc/ref/api-io.texi                          |  49 ++++---
 doc/ref/api-languages.texi                   |  48 +++---
 doc/ref/api-macros.texi                      |  85 +++++------
 doc/ref/api-memory.texi                      |  30 ++--
 doc/ref/api-modules.texi                     |   6 +-
 doc/ref/api-options.texi                     |  10 +-
 doc/ref/api-peg.texi                         |  12 +-
 doc/ref/api-procedures.texi                  |  36 ++---
 doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi                  |  16 +-
 doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi                |  12 +-
 doc/ref/api-utility.texi                     |   2 +-
 doc/ref/expect.texi                          |   6 +-
 doc/ref/goops.texi                           |  38 ++---
 doc/ref/misc-modules.texi                    |   2 +-
 doc/ref/posix.texi                           |  12 +-
 doc/ref/repl-modules.texi                    |   4 +-
 doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi                    |  20 +--
 doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi                  |   2 +-
 doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi                    |   6 +-
 gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch            |   2 +-
 gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch  |  16 +-
 gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch             |  16 +-
 lib/alloca.in.h                              |   2 +-
 lib/c-ctype.h                                |   2 +-
 lib/malloca.h                                |   4 +-
 lib/nstrftime.c                              |   2 +-
 lib/verify.h                                 |   2 +-
 lib/xalloc-oversized.h                       |   4 +-
 libguile/gc.h                                |   4 +-
 libguile/ioext.c                             |   2 +-
 libguile/list.c                              |   2 +-
 libguile/options.c                           |   2 +-
 libguile/posix.c                             |   6 +-
 libguile/threads.c                           |   2 +-
 module/ice-9/boot-9.scm                      |  10 +-
 module/ice-9/optargs.scm                     |   2 +-
 module/ice-9/ports.scm                       |   2 +-
 module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm                |   2 +-
 module/ice-9/psyntax.scm                     |   2 +-
 module/language/elisp/parser.scm             |   2 +-
 module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm |   4 +-
 module/srfi/srfi-37.scm                      |   2 +-
 module/srfi/srfi-43.scm                      |  12 +-
 module/statprof.scm                          |   2 +-
 module/texinfo/reflection.scm                |   2 +-
 test-suite/tests/eval.test                   |   4 +-
 test-suite/tests/fluids.test                 |   2 +-
 55 files changed, 417 insertions(+), 408 deletions(-)

diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index 8ed39ceb9..0c1da90be 100644
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -9527,7 +9527,7 @@ Use scm_object_to_string instead.
 
 ** Deprecated function:  scm_wta
 
-Use scm_wrong_type_arg, or another appropriate error signalling function
+Use scm_wrong_type_arg, or another appropriate error signaling function
 instead.
 
 ** Explicit support for obarrays has been deprecated.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-control.texi b/doc/ref/api-control.texi
index d024e14a5..ee6969289 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-control.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-control.texi
@@ -404,7 +404,7 @@ For example,
 
 Note that each @code{break} and @code{continue} procedure can only be
 used within the dynamic extent of its @code{while}.  Outside the
-@code{while} their behaviour is unspecified.
+@code{while} their behavior is unspecified.
 @end deffn
 
 @cindex named let
@@ -567,14 +567,14 @@ incremented by 34:
 @end example
 
 The last example illustrates what we mean when we say, "composes with the
-current continuation". We mean that there is a current continuation -- some
+current continuation".  We mean that there is a current continuation -- some
 remaining things to compute, like @code{(lambda (x) (* x 2))} -- and that
 calling the saved continuation doesn't wipe out the current continuation, it
 composes the saved continuation with the current one.
 
 We're belaboring the point here because traditional Scheme continuations, as
 discussed in the next section, aren't composable, and are actually less
-expressive than continuations captured by prompts. But there's a place for them
+expressive than continuations captured by prompts.  But there's a place for them
 both.
 
 Before moving on, we should mention that if the handler of a prompt is a
@@ -1553,7 +1553,7 @@ The above @code{scm_with_throw_handler} takes Scheme procedures as body
 (thunk) and handler arguments.  @code{scm_c_with_throw_handler} is an
 equivalent taking C functions.  See @code{scm_c_catch}
 (@pxref{Exceptions and C}) for a description of the parameters, the
-behaviour however of course follows @code{with-throw-handler}.
+behavior however of course follows @code{with-throw-handler}.
 @end deftypefn
 
 
@@ -1655,12 +1655,12 @@ scm_foo (SCM s1, SCM s2)
 
   c_s1 = scm_to_locale_string (s1);
 
-  /* Call 'free (c_s1)' when the dynwind context is left. 
+  /* Call 'free (c_s1)' when the dynwind context is left.
   */
   scm_dynwind_unwind_handler (free, c_s1, SCM_F_WIND_EXPLICITLY);
 
   c_s2 = scm_to_locale_string (s2);
-  
+
   /* Same as above, but more concisely.
   */
   scm_dynwind_free (c_s2);
@@ -1891,7 +1891,7 @@ Return @code{#t} if @var{obj} is a fluid; otherwise, return
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_fluid_ref (fluid)
 Return the value associated with @var{fluid} in the current
 dynamic root.  If @var{fluid} has not been set, then return
-its default value. Calling @code{fluid-ref} on an unbound fluid produces
+its default value.  Calling @code{fluid-ref} on an unbound fluid produces
 a runtime error.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1996,7 +1996,7 @@ dynamic state object.
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_set_current_dynamic_state (state)
 Restore the saved fluid-value associations from @var{state}, replacing
 the current fluid-value associations.  Return the current fluid-value
-associatoins as a dynamic state object, as in
+associations as a dynamic state object, as in
 @code{current-dynamic-state}.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -2302,7 +2302,7 @@ Output}), and the corresponding arguments in the @var{args} list.
 @end deftypefn
 
 
-@subsubsection Signalling Type Errors
+@subsubsection Signaling Type Errors
 
 Every function visible at the Scheme level should aggressively check the
 types of its arguments, to avoid misinterpreting a value, and perhaps
@@ -2310,7 +2310,7 @@ causing a segmentation fault.  Guile provides some macros to make this
 easier.
 
 @deftypefn Macro void SCM_ASSERT (int @var{test}, SCM @var{obj}, unsigned int @var{position}, const char *@var{subr})
-@deftypefnx Macro void SCM_ASSERT_TYPE (int @var{test}, SCM @var{obj}, unsigned int @var{position}, const char *@var{subr}, const char *@var{expected}) 
+@deftypefnx Macro void SCM_ASSERT_TYPE (int @var{test}, SCM @var{obj}, unsigned int @var{position}, const char *@var{subr}, const char *@var{expected})
 If @var{test} is zero, signal a ``wrong type argument'' error,
 attributed to the subroutine named @var{subr}, operating on the value
 @var{obj}, which is the @var{position}'th argument of @var{subr}.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-data.texi b/doc/ref/api-data.texi
index d78690fff..3b9933d97 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-data.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-data.texi
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ complex.
 * Structures::                  Low-level record representation.
 * Dictionary Types::            About dictionary types in general.
 * Association Lists::           List-based dictionaries.
-* VHashes::                     VList-based dictionaries.   
+* VHashes::                     VList-based dictionaries.
 * Hash Tables::                 Table-based dictionaries.
 * Other Types::                 Other sections describe data types too.
 @end menu
@@ -190,17 +190,17 @@ Whole numbers, positive or negative; e.g.@: --5, 0, 18.
 @item rationals
 The set of numbers that can be expressed as @math{@var{p}/@var{q}}
 where @var{p} and @var{q} are integers; e.g.@: @math{9/16} works, but
-pi (an irrational number) doesn't. These include integers
+pi (an irrational number) doesn't.  These include integers
 (@math{@var{n}/1}).
 
 @item real numbers
 The set of numbers that describes all possible positions along a
-one-dimensional line. This includes rationals as well as irrational
+one-dimensional line.  This includes rationals as well as irrational
 numbers.
 
 @item complex numbers
 The set of numbers that describes all possible positions in a two
-dimensional space. This includes real as well as imaginary numbers
+dimensional space.  This includes real as well as imaginary numbers
 (@math{@var{a}+@var{b}i}, where @var{a} is the @dfn{real part},
 @var{b} is the @dfn{imaginary part}, and @math{i} is the square root of
 @minus{}1.)
@@ -595,7 +595,7 @@ rational numbers, i.e.@: the predicate will also be fulfilled if
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} rationalize x eps
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_rationalize (x, eps)
 Returns the @emph{simplest} rational number differing
-from @var{x} by no more than @var{eps}.  
+from @var{x} by no more than @var{eps}.
 
 As required by @acronym{R5RS}, @code{rationalize} only returns an
 exact result when both its arguments are exact.  Thus, you might need
@@ -767,7 +767,7 @@ otherwise.
 Return a @code{1} if the number @var{z} is exact, and @code{0}
 otherwise.  This is equivalent to @code{scm_is_true (scm_exact_p (z))}.
 
-An alternate approch to testing the exactness of a number is to 
+An alternate approach to testing the exactness of a number is to
 use @code{scm_is_signed_integer} or @code{scm_is_unsigned_integer}.
 @end deftypefn
 
@@ -800,7 +800,7 @@ number that has been marked exact with the ``#e'' prefix, Guile is
 able to represent it correctly.
 
 @lisp
-(inexact->exact 1.2)  
+(inexact->exact 1.2)
 @result{} 5404319552844595/4503599627370496
 
 #e1.2
@@ -1831,7 +1831,7 @@ Return a number in [0, @var{n}).
 
 Accepts a positive integer or real n and returns a
 number of the same type between zero (inclusive) and
-@var{n} (exclusive). The values returned have a uniform
+@var{n} (exclusive).  The values returned have a uniform
 distribution.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1943,7 +1943,7 @@ applications, do this during initialization of your program:
 @subsection Characters
 @tpindex Characters
 
-In Scheme, there is a data type to describe a single character.  
+In Scheme, there is a data type to describe a single character.
 
 Defining what exactly a character @emph{is} can be more complicated
 than it seems.  Guile follows the advice of R6RS and uses The Unicode
@@ -1985,7 +1985,7 @@ this convenient notation is not valid code.  Guile does not interpret
 In Scheme, a character literal is written as @code{#\@var{name}} where
 @var{name} is the name of the character that you want.  Printable
 characters have their usual single character name; for example,
-@code{#\a} is a lower case @code{a}.  
+@code{#\a} is a lower case @code{a}.
 
 Some of the code points are 'combining characters' that are not meant
 to be printed by themselves but are instead meant to modify the
@@ -2202,8 +2202,8 @@ Return @code{#t} if @var{chr} is either uppercase or lowercase, else
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} char-general-category chr
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_char_general_category (chr)
-Return a symbol giving the two-letter name of the Unicode general 
-category assigned to @var{chr} or @code{#f} if no named category is 
+Return a symbol giving the two-letter name of the Unicode general
+category assigned to @var{chr} or @code{#f} if no named category is
 assigned.  The following table provides a list of category names along
 with their meanings.
 
@@ -2305,12 +2305,12 @@ Return the lowercase character version of @var{chr}.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} char-titlecase chr
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_char_titlecase (chr)
 Return the titlecase character version of @var{chr} if one exists;
-otherwise return the uppercase version.  
+otherwise return the uppercase version.
 
-For most characters these will be the same, but the Unicode Standard 
+For most characters these will be the same, but the Unicode Standard
 includes certain digraph compatibility characters, such as @code{U+01F3}
-``dz'', for which the uppercase and titlecase characters are different 
-(@code{U+01F1} ``DZ'' and @code{U+01F2} ``Dz'' in this case, 
+``dz'', for which the uppercase and titlecase characters are different
+(@code{U+01F1} ``DZ'' and @code{U+01F2} ``Dz'' in this case,
 respectively).
 @end deffn
 
@@ -2452,7 +2452,7 @@ from the initial seed: @var{seed}, (@var{g} @var{seed}),
 (@var{g}^2 @var{seed}), (@var{g}^3 @var{seed}), @dots{}
 @item @var{p} tells us when to stop -- when it returns true
 when applied to one of the seed values.
-@item @var{f} maps each seed value to a character. These
+@item @var{f} maps each seed value to a character.  These
 characters are added to the base character set @var{base_cs} to
 form the result; @var{base_cs} defaults to the empty set.
 @end itemize
@@ -2467,7 +2467,7 @@ from the initial seed: @var{seed}, (@var{g} @var{seed}),
 (@var{g}^2 @var{seed}), (@var{g}^3 @var{seed}), @dots{}
 @item @var{p} tells us when to stop -- when it returns true
 when applied to one of the seed values.
-@item @var{f} maps each seed value to a character. These
+@item @var{f} maps each seed value to a character.  These
 characters are added to the base character set @var{base_cs} to
 form the result; @var{base_cs} defaults to the empty set.
 @end itemize
@@ -2580,7 +2580,7 @@ returned.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} ->char-set x
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_to_char_set (x)
 Coerces x into a char-set. @var{x} may be a string, character or
-char-set. A string is converted to the set of its constituent
+char-set.  A string is converted to the set of its constituent
 characters; a character is converted to a singleton set; a char-set is
 returned as-is.
 @end deffn
@@ -2595,7 +2595,7 @@ procedures.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} %char-set-dump cs
 Returns an association list containing debugging information
-for @var{cs}. The association list has the following entries.
+for @var{cs}.  The association list has the following entries.
 @table @code
 @item char-set
 The char-set itself
@@ -2768,7 +2768,7 @@ useful, several predefined character set variables exist.
 
 These character sets are locale independent and are not recomputed
 upon a @code{setlocale} call.  They contain characters from the whole
-range of Unicode code points. For instance, @code{char-set:letter}
+range of Unicode code points.  For instance, @code{char-set:letter}
 contains about 100,000 characters.
 
 @defvr {Scheme Variable} char-set:lower-case
@@ -3578,7 +3578,7 @@ mismatch index, depending upon whether @var{s1} is less than,
 equal to, or greater than @var{s2}.  The mismatch index is the
 largest index @var{i} such that for every 0 <= @var{j} <
 @var{i}, @var{s1}[@var{j}] = @var{s2}[@var{j}] -- that is,
-@var{i} is the first position where the lowercased letters 
+@var{i} is the first position where the lowercased letters
 do not match.
 
 @end deffn
@@ -3663,32 +3663,36 @@ case-insensitively.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} string-hash s [bound [start [end]]]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_substring_hash (s, bound, start, end)
-Compute a hash value for @var{s}.  The optional argument @var{bound} is a non-negative exact integer specifying the range of the hash function. A positive value restricts the return value to the range [0,bound).
+Compute a hash value for @var{s}.  The optional argument @var{bound} is
+a non-negative exact integer specifying the range of the hash function.
+A positive value restricts the return value to the range [0,bound).
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} string-hash-ci s [bound [start [end]]]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_substring_hash_ci (s, bound, start, end)
-Compute a hash value for @var{s}.  The optional argument @var{bound} is a non-negative exact integer specifying the range of the hash function. A positive value restricts the return value to the range [0,bound).
+Compute a hash value for @var{s}.  The optional argument @var{bound} is
+a non-negative exact integer specifying the range of the hash function.
+A positive value restricts the return value to the range [0,bound).
 @end deffn
 
-Because the same visual appearance of an abstract Unicode character can 
-be obtained via multiple sequences of Unicode characters, even the 
+Because the same visual appearance of an abstract Unicode character can
+be obtained via multiple sequences of Unicode characters, even the
 case-insensitive string comparison functions described above may return
-@code{#f} when presented with strings containing different 
-representations of the same character.  For example, the Unicode 
-character ``LATIN SMALL LETTER S WITH DOT BELOW AND DOT ABOVE'' can be 
+@code{#f} when presented with strings containing different
+representations of the same character.  For example, the Unicode
+character ``LATIN SMALL LETTER S WITH DOT BELOW AND DOT ABOVE'' can be
 represented with a single character (U+1E69) or by the character ``LATIN
-SMALL LETTER S'' (U+0073) followed by the combining marks ``COMBINING 
+SMALL LETTER S'' (U+0073) followed by the combining marks ``COMBINING
 DOT BELOW'' (U+0323) and ``COMBINING DOT ABOVE'' (U+0307).
 
 For this reason, it is often desirable to ensure that the strings
-to be compared are using a mutually consistent representation for every 
+to be compared are using a mutually consistent representation for every
 character.  The Unicode standard defines two methods of normalizing the
-contents of strings: Decomposition, which breaks composite characters 
+contents of strings: Decomposition, which breaks composite characters
 into a set of constituent characters with an ordering defined by the
 Unicode Standard; and composition, which performs the converse.
 
-There are two decomposition operations.  ``Canonical decomposition'' 
+There are two decomposition operations.  ``Canonical decomposition''
 produces character sequences that share the same visual appearance as
 the original characters, while ``compatibility decomposition'' produces
 ones whose visual appearances may differ from the originals but which
@@ -4229,7 +4233,8 @@ a predicate, if it is a character, it is tested for equality and if it
 is a character set, it is tested for membership.
 @end deffn
 
-The following additional functions are available in the module @code{(ice-9 string-fun)}. They can be used with:
+The following additional functions are available in the module
+@code{(ice-9 string-fun)}.  They can be used with:
 
 @example
 (use-modules (ice-9 string-fun))
@@ -4237,7 +4242,7 @@ The following additional functions are available in the module @code{(ice-9 stri
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} string-replace-substring str substring replacement
 Return a new string where every instance of @var{substring} in string
-@var{str} has been replaced by @var{replacement}. For example:
+@var{str} has been replaced by @var{replacement}.  For example:
 
 @lisp
 (string-replace-substring "a ring of strings" "ring" "rut")
@@ -4248,7 +4253,7 @@ Return a new string where every instance of @var{substring} in string
 @node Representing Strings as Bytes
 @subsubsection Representing Strings as Bytes
 
-Out in the cold world outside of Guile, not all strings are treated in
+In the cold world outside of Guile, not all strings are treated in
 the same way.  Out there there are only bytes, and there are many ways
 of representing a strings (sequences of characters) as binary data
 (sequences of bytes).
@@ -4552,7 +4557,7 @@ Return the number of bytes used to encode a Unicode code point in string
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} %string-dump str
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_sys_string_dump (str)
 Returns an association list containing debugging information for
-@var{str}. The association list has the following entries.
+@var{str}.  The association list has the following entries.
 @table @code
 
 @item string
@@ -4670,15 +4675,15 @@ themselves to @code{eq?} comparison.  But symbols are more descriptive
 than numbers, because a symbol's name can be used directly to describe
 the concept for which that symbol stands.
 
-For example, imagine that you need to represent some colours in a
+For example, imagine that you need to represent some colors in a
 computer program.  Using numbers, you would have to choose arbitrarily
-some mapping between numbers and colours, and then take care to use that
+some mapping between numbers and colors, and then take care to use that
 mapping consistently:
 
 @lisp
 ;; 1=red, 2=green, 3=purple
 
-(if (eq? (colour-of vehicle) 1)
+(if (eq? (color-of vehicle) 1)
     ...)
 @end lisp
 
@@ -4691,16 +4696,16 @@ defining constants:
 (define green 2)
 (define purple 3)
 
-(if (eq? (colour-of vehicle) red)
+(if (eq? (color-of vehicle) red)
     ...)
 @end lisp
 
 @noindent
 But the simplest and clearest approach is not to use numbers at all, but
-symbols whose names specify the colours that they refer to:
+symbols whose names specify the colors that they refer to:
 
 @lisp
-(if (eq? (colour-of vehicle) 'red)
+(if (eq? (color-of vehicle) 'red)
     ...)
 @end lisp
 
@@ -4754,7 +4759,7 @@ mixing all the properties up together in a flat list, we could use an
 association list like this:
 
 @lisp
-(define car1-properties '((colour . red)
+(define car1-properties '((color . red)
                           (transmission . manual)
                           (fuel . unleaded)
                           (steering . power-assisted)))
@@ -4767,11 +4772,11 @@ It also allows further properties to use the same symbols among their
 possible values without becoming ambiguous:
 
 @lisp
-(define car1-properties '((colour . red)
+(define car1-properties '((color . red)
                           (transmission . manual)
                           (fuel . unleaded)
                           (steering . power-assisted)
-                          (seat-colour . red)
+                          (seat-color . red)
                           (locking . manual)))
 @end lisp
 
@@ -4783,13 +4788,13 @@ extract or change individual pieces of information:
 (assq-ref car1-properties 'fuel) @result{} unleaded
 (assq-ref car1-properties 'transmission) @result{} manual
 
-(assq-set! car1-properties 'seat-colour 'black)
+(assq-set! car1-properties 'seat-color 'black)
 @result{}
-((colour . red)
+((color . red)
  (transmission . manual)
  (fuel . unleaded)
  (steering . power-assisted)
- (seat-colour . black)
+ (seat-color . black)
  (locking . manual)))
 @end lisp
 
@@ -4927,11 +4932,11 @@ reading symbols case-insensitively, @var{str} is converted to lowercase
 before the returned symbol is looked up or created.
 @end deffn
 
-The following examples illustrate Guile's detailed behaviour as regards
+The following examples illustrate Guile's detailed behavior as regards
 the case-sensitivity of symbols:
 
 @lisp
-(read-enable 'case-insensitive)   ; R5RS compliant behaviour
+(read-enable 'case-insensitive)   ; R5RS compliant behavior
 
 (symbol->string 'flying-fish)    @result{} "flying-fish"
 (symbol->string 'Martin)         @result{} "martin"
@@ -4947,7 +4952,7 @@ the case-sensitivity of symbols:
   (symbol->string
     (string->symbol "K. Harper, M.D."))) @result{} #t
 
-(read-disable 'case-insensitive)   ; Guile default behaviour
+(read-disable 'case-insensitive)   ; Guile default behavior
 
 (symbol->string 'flying-fish)    @result{} "flying-fish"
 (symbol->string 'Martin)         @result{} "Martin"
@@ -5708,7 +5713,7 @@ or a pair which has a list in its cdr.
 @c FIXME::martin: What is a proper, what an improper list?
 @c What is a circular list?
 
-@c FIXME::martin: Maybe steal some graphics from the Elisp reference 
+@c FIXME::martin: Maybe steal some graphics from the Elisp reference
 @c manual?
 
 @menu
@@ -5752,7 +5757,7 @@ up a list.  An example will clear that up:
 
 This example also shows that lists have to be quoted when written
 (@pxref{Expression Syntax}), because they would otherwise be
-mistakingly taken as procedure applications (@pxref{Simple
+mistakenly taken as procedure applications (@pxref{Simple
 Invocation}).
 
 
@@ -5863,7 +5868,7 @@ Return the number of elements in list @var{lst}.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} last-pair lst
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_last_pair (lst)
-Return the last pair in @var{lst}, signalling an error if
+Return the last pair in @var{lst}, signaling an error if
 @var{lst} is circular.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -6333,7 +6338,7 @@ Copy the block of elements from vector @var{src} in the range
 to the length of @var{src}.
 
 It is an error for @var{dst} to have a length less than @var{at} +
-(@var{end} - @var{start}).  
+(@var{end} - @var{start}).
 
 The order in which elements are copied is unspecified, except that if the
 source and destination overlap, copying takes place as if the source is
@@ -7285,11 +7290,11 @@ numeric vectors, bytevectors, bit vectors and ordinary vectors as one
 dimensional arrays.
 
 @menu
-* Array Syntax::                
-* Array Procedures::            
-* Shared Arrays::               
+* Array Syntax::
+* Array Procedures::
+* Shared Arrays::
 * Arrays as arrays of arrays::
-* Accessing Arrays from C::     
+* Accessing Arrays from C::
 @end menu
 
 @node Array Syntax
@@ -7333,7 +7338,7 @@ As a special case, an array of rank 0 is printed as
 @code{#0<vectag>(<scalar>)}, where @code{<scalar>} is the result of
 printing the single element of the array.
 
-Thus, 
+Thus,
 
 @table @code
 @item #(1 2 3)
@@ -7840,16 +7845,16 @@ themselves arrays (`cells').
 
 We speak of the first @math{n-k} dimensions of the array as the
 @math{n-k}-`frame' of the array, while the last @math{k} dimensions are
-the dimensions of the @math{k}-`cells'. For example, a 3-array can be
+the dimensions of the @math{k}-`cells'.  For example, a 3-array can be
 seen as a 2-array of vectors (1-arrays) or as a 1-array of matrices
-(2-arrays). In each case, the vectors or matrices are the 1-cells or
-2-cells of the array. This terminology originates in the J language.
+(2-arrays).  In each case, the vectors or matrices are the 1-cells or
+2-cells of the array.  This terminology originates in the J language.
 
 @cindex array slice
 @cindex prefix slice
 
 The more vague concept of a `slice' refers to a subset of the array
-where some indices are fixed and others are left free. As a Guile data
+where some indices are fixed and others are left free.  As a Guile data
 object, a cell is the same as a `prefix slice' (the first @math{n-k}
 indices into the original array are fixed), except that a 0-cell is not
 a shared array of the original array, but a 0-slice (where all the
@@ -7858,7 +7863,7 @@ indices into the original array are fixed) is.
 @cindex enclosed array
 
 Before @w{version 2.0}, Guile had a feature called `enclosed arrays' to
-create special `array of arrays' objects. The functions in this section
+create special `array of arrays' objects.  The functions in this section
 do not need special types; instead, the frame rank is stated in each
 function call, either implicitly or explicitly.
 
@@ -7866,7 +7871,7 @@ function call, either implicitly or explicitly.
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_array_cell_ref (array, idxlist)
 If the length of @var{idxlist} equals the rank @math{n} of @var{array},
 return the element at @code{(idx @dots{})}, just like @code{(array-ref
-array idx @dots{})}. If, however, the length @math{k} of @var{idxlist}
+array idx @dots{})}.  If, however, the length @math{k} of @var{idxlist}
 is smaller than @math{n}, then return the @math{(n-k)}-cell of
 @var{array} given by @var{idxlist}, as a shared array.
 
@@ -7896,7 +7901,7 @@ For example:
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_array_slice (array, idxlist)
 Like @code{(array-cell-ref array idx @dots{})}, but return a 0-rank
 shared array into @var{ARRAY} if the length of @var{idxlist} matches the
-rank of @var{array}. This can be useful when using @var{ARRAY} as a
+rank of @var{array}.  This can be useful when using @var{ARRAY} as a
 place to write to.
 
 Compare:
@@ -9158,7 +9163,7 @@ scheme@@(guile-user)> (struct-ref $3 vtable-index-layout)
 $6 = pwuhuhpwphuhuhpwpwpw
 scheme@@(guile-user)> (struct-ref $4 vtable-index-layout)
 $7 = pwuhuhpwphuhuh
-scheme@@(guile-user)> standard-vtable-fields 
+scheme@@(guile-user)> standard-vtable-fields
 $8 = "pwuhuhpwphuhuh"
 scheme@@(guile-user)> (struct-ref $2 vtable-offset-user)
 $9 = module
@@ -9228,7 +9233,7 @@ class fields.
   (let* ((fields (compute-fields parent fields))
          (layout (compute-layout fields)))
     (make-struct/no-tail <class>
-      layout 
+      layout
       (lambda (x port)
         (print-instance x port))
       name
@@ -9382,7 +9387,7 @@ procedures for manipulating them.
 @subsubsection Alist Key Equality
 
 All of Guile's dedicated association list procedures, apart from
-@code{acons}, come in three flavours, depending on the level of equality
+@code{acons}, come in three flavors, depending on the level of equality
 that is required to decide whether an existing key in the association
 list is the same as the key that the procedure call uses to identify the
 required entry.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-debug.texi b/doc/ref/api-debug.texi
index 660989895..faa0c40bd 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-debug.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-debug.texi
@@ -36,19 +36,19 @@ A Scheme stack always exists implicitly, and can be summoned into
 concrete existence as a first-class Scheme value by the
 @code{make-stack} call, so that an introspective Scheme program -- such
 as a debugger -- can present it in some way and allow the user to query
-its details. The first thing to understand, therefore, is how Guile's
+its details.  The first thing to understand, therefore, is how Guile's
 function call convention creates the stack.
 
-Broadly speaking, Guile represents all control flow on a stack. Calling
+Broadly speaking, Guile represents all control flow on a stack.  Calling
 a function involves pushing an empty frame on the stack, then evaluating
 the procedure and its arguments, then fixing up the new frame so that it
-points to the old one. Frames on the stack are thus linked together. A
+points to the old one.  Frames on the stack are thus linked together.  A
 tail call is the same, except it reuses the existing frame instead of
 pushing on a new one.
 
 In this way, the only frames that are on the stack are ``active''
 frames, frames which need to do some work before the computation is
-complete. On the other hand, a function that has tail-called another
+complete.  On the other hand, a function that has tail-called another
 function will not be on the stack, as it has no work left to do.
 
 Therefore, when an error occurs in a running program, or the program
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ Use @code{start-stack} to limit the stack extent captured by future
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} make-stack obj arg @dots{}
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_stack (obj, args)
-Create a new stack. If @var{obj} is @code{#t}, the current
+Create a new stack.  If @var{obj} is @code{#t}, the current
 evaluation stack is used for creating the stack frames,
 otherwise the frames are taken from @var{obj} (which must be
 a continuation or a frame object).
@@ -239,7 +239,7 @@ output.
 Additionally, the @code{(system vm frame)} module defines a number of
 higher-level introspective procedures, for example to retrieve the names
 of local variables, and the source location to correspond to a
-frame. See its source code for more details.
+frame.  See its source code for more details.
 
 
 @node Source Properties
@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ with the new pair.
 @subsection Programmatic Error Handling
 
 For better or for worse, all programs have bugs, and dealing with bugs
-is part of programming. This section deals with that class of bugs that
+is part of programming.  This section deals with that class of bugs that
 causes an exception to be raised -- from your own code, from within a
 library, or from Guile itself.
 
@@ -733,7 +733,7 @@ warn-deprecated no      Warn when deprecated features are used.
 @end smallexample
 
 The boolean options may be toggled with @code{debug-enable} and
-@code{debug-disable}. The non-boolean options must be set using
+@code{debug-disable}.  The non-boolean options must be set using
 @code{debug-set!}.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} debug-enable option-name
@@ -766,16 +766,16 @@ it chooses for examining the evaluation stack as program execution
 proceeds, and for suspending execution to be resumed later.
 
 VM hooks are very low-level, though, and so Guile also has a library of
-higher-level @dfn{traps} on top of the VM hooks. A trap is an execution
-condition that, when fulfilled, will fire a handler. For example, Guile
+higher-level @dfn{traps} on top of the VM hooks.  A trap is an execution
+condition that, when fulfilled, will fire a handler.  For example, Guile
 defines a trap that fires when control reaches a certain source
 location.
 
 Finally, Guile also defines a third level of abstractions: per-thread
-@dfn{trap states}. A trap state exists to give names to traps, and to
+@dfn{trap states}.  A trap state exists to give names to traps, and to
 hold on to the set of traps so that they can be enabled, disabled, or
-removed. The trap state infrastructure defines the most useful
-abstractions for most cases. For example, Guile's REPL uses trap state
+removed.  The trap state infrastructure defines the most useful
+abstractions for most cases.  For example, Guile's REPL uses trap state
 functions to set breakpoints and tracepoints.
 
 The following subsections describe all this in detail, for both the
@@ -789,7 +789,7 @@ understanding how the interface hangs together.
 * Low-Level Traps::         The various kinds of low-level traps.
 * Tracing Traps::           Traps to trace procedure calls and returns.
 * Trap States::             One state (per thread) to bind them.
-* High-Level Traps::        The highest-level trap interface. Use this.
+* High-Level Traps::        The highest-level trap interface.  Use this.
 @end menu
 
 
@@ -800,8 +800,8 @@ Everything that runs in Guile runs on its virtual machine, a C program
 that defines a number of operations that Scheme programs can
 perform.
 
-Note that there are multiple VM ``engines'' for Guile. Only some of them
-have support for hooks compiled in. Normally the deal is that you get
+Note that there are multiple VM ``engines'' for Guile.  Only some of them
+have support for hooks compiled in.  Normally the deal is that you get
 hooks if you are running interactively, and otherwise they are disabled,
 as they do have some overhead (about 10 or 20 percent).
 
@@ -821,7 +821,7 @@ does a terrible thing: it allocates the frames on the C stack instead of
 the garbage-collected heap.
 
 The upshot here is that the frames are only valid within the dynamic
-extent of the call to the hook. If a hook procedure keeps a reference to
+extent of the call to the hook.  If a hook procedure keeps a reference to
 the frame outside the extent of the hook, bad things will happen.
 
 The interface to hooks is provided by the @code{(system vm vm)} module:
@@ -875,10 +875,10 @@ Remove @var{f} from the corresponding VM hook for the current thread.
 @end deffn
 
 @cindex VM trace level
-These hooks do impose a performance penalty, if they are on. Obviously,
-the @code{vm-next-hook} has quite an impact, performance-wise. Therefore
+These hooks do impose a performance penalty, if they are on.  Obviously,
+the @code{vm-next-hook} has quite an impact, performance-wise.  Therefore
 Guile exposes a single, heavy-handed knob to turn hooks on or off, the
-@dfn{VM trace level}. If the trace level is positive, hooks run;
+@dfn{VM trace level}.  If the trace level is positive, hooks run;
 otherwise they don't.
 
 For convenience, when the VM fires a hook, it does so with the trap
@@ -887,8 +887,8 @@ handling a hook.  The trace level is restored to whatever it was once the hook
 procedure finishes.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} vm-trace-level
-Retrieve the ``trace level'' of the VM. If positive, the trace hooks
-associated with @var{vm} will be run. The initial trace level is 0.
+Retrieve the ``trace level'' of the VM.  If positive, the trace hooks
+associated with @var{vm} will be run.  The initial trace level is 0.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} set-vm-trace-level! level
@@ -907,7 +907,7 @@ correspond to what users want to do.
 For example, if a user wants to break when and if control reaches a
 certain source location, how do you do it?  If you install a ``next''
 hook, you get unacceptable overhead for the execution of the entire
-program. It would be possible to install an ``apply'' hook, then if the
+program.  It would be possible to install an ``apply'' hook, then if the
 procedure encompasses those source locations, install a ``next'' hook,
 but already you're talking about one concept that might be implemented
 by a varying number of lower-level concepts.
@@ -916,27 +916,27 @@ It's best to be clear about things and define one abstraction for all
 such conditions: the @dfn{trap}.
 
 Considering the myriad capabilities offered by the hooks though, there
-is only a minimum of functionality shared by all traps. Guile's current
+is only a minimum of functionality shared by all traps.  Guile's current
 take is to reduce this to the absolute minimum, and have the only
 standard interface of a trap be ``turn yourself on'' or ``turn yourself
 off''.
 
 This interface sounds a bit strange, but it is useful to procedurally
-compose higher-level traps from lower-level building blocks. For
+compose higher-level traps from lower-level building blocks.  For
 example, Guile defines a trap that calls one handler when control enters
-a procedure, and another when control leaves the procedure. Given that
+a procedure, and another when control leaves the procedure.  Given that
 trap, one can define a trap that adds to the next-hook only when within
-a given procedure. Building further, one can define a trap that fires
+a given procedure.  Building further, one can define a trap that fires
 when control reaches particular instructions within a procedure.
 
-Or of course you can stop at any of these intermediate levels. For
-example, one might only be interested in calls to a given procedure. But
+Or of course you can stop at any of these intermediate levels.  For
+example, one might only be interested in calls to a given procedure.  But
 the point is that a simple enable/disable interface is all the
 commonality that exists between the various kinds of traps, and
 furthermore that such an interface serves to allow ``higher-level''
 traps to be composed from more primitive ones.
 
-Specifically, a trap, in Guile, is a procedure. When a trap is created,
+Specifically, a trap, in Guile, is a procedure.  When a trap is created,
 by convention the trap is enabled; therefore, the procedure that is the
 trap will, when called, disable the trap, and return a procedure that
 will enable the trap, and so on.
@@ -945,10 +945,10 @@ Trap procedures take one optional argument: the current frame. (A trap
 may want to add to different sets of hooks depending on the frame that
 is current at enable-time.)
 
-If this all sounds very complicated, it's because it is. Some of it is
-essential, but probably most of it is not. The advantage of using this
+If this all sounds very complicated, it's because it is.  Some of it is
+essential, but probably most of it is not.  The advantage of using this
 minimal interface is that composability is more lexically apparent than
-when, for example, using a stateful interface based on GOOPS. But
+when, for example, using a stateful interface based on GOOPS.  But
 perhaps this reflects the cognitive limitations of the programmer who
 made the current interface more than anything else.
 
@@ -958,20 +958,20 @@ made the current interface more than anything else.
 To summarize the last sections, traps are enabled or disabled, and when
 they are enabled, they add to various VM hooks.
 
-Note, however, that @emph{traps do not increase the VM trace level}. So
+Note, however, that @emph{traps do not increase the VM trace level}.  So
 if you create a trap, it will be enabled, but unless something else
 increases the VM's trace level (@pxref{VM Hooks}), the trap will not
 fire.  It turns out that getting the VM trace level right is tricky
 without a global view of what traps are enabled.  @xref{Trap States},
 for Guile's answer to this problem.
 
-Traps are created by calling procedures. Most of these procedures share
+Traps are created by calling procedures.  Most of these procedures share
 a set of common keyword arguments, so rather than document them
 separately, we discuss them all together here:
 
 @table @code
 @item #:vm
-The VM to instrument. Defaults to the current thread's VM.
+The VM to instrument.  Defaults to the current thread's VM.
 @item #:current-frame
 For traps that enable more hooks depending on their dynamic context,
 this argument gives the current frame that the trap is running in.
@@ -1028,7 +1028,7 @@ A trap that calls @var{next-handler} for every instruction executed in
        handler [#:current-frame] [#:vm]
 A trap that calls @var{handler} when execution enters a range of
 instructions in @var{proc}. @var{range} is a simple of pairs,
-@code{((@var{start} . @var{end}) ...)}. The @var{start} addresses are
+@code{((@var{start} . @var{end}) ...)}.  The @var{start} addresses are
 inclusive, and @var{end} addresses are exclusive.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1146,13 +1146,13 @@ options:
 
 @table @code
 @item #:width
-The maximum width of trace output. Trace printouts will try not to
+The maximum width of trace output.  Trace printouts will try not to
 exceed this column, but for highly nested procedure calls, it may be
-unavoidable. Defaults to 80.
+unavoidable.  Defaults to 80.
 @item #:vm
-The VM on which to add the traps. Defaults to the current thread's VM.
+The VM on which to add the traps.  Defaults to the current thread's VM.
 @item #:prefix
-A string to print out before each trace line. As seen above in the
+A string to print out before each trace line.  As seen above in the
 examples, defaults to @code{"trace: "}.
 @end table
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi b/doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi
index 76f099727..049052ff9 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-deprecated.texi
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Guile's @dfn{deprecation} is a mechanism that can help you cope with
 this.
 
 When you use a feature that is deprecated, you will likely get a warning
-message at run-time. Also, if you have a new enough toolchain, using a
+message at run-time.  Also, if you have a new enough toolchain, using a
 deprecated function from @code{libguile} will cause a link-time warning.
 
 The primary source for information about just what interfaces are
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi b/doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi
index 7c08e2494..68bf38e54 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-evaluation.texi
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ x @result{} 123
 @end example
 
 @item (@var{proc} @var{args}@dots{})
-A parenthesised expression is a function call.  @var{proc} and each
+A parenthesized expression is a function call.  @var{proc} and each
 argument are evaluated, then the function (which @var{proc} evaluated
 to) is called with those arguments.
 
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ unspecified, so be careful when using expressions with side effects.
 ((get-some-proc) 1 2 3) @result{} 1
 @end example
 
-The same sort of parenthesised form is used for a macro invocation,
+The same sort of parenthesized form is used for a macro invocation,
 but in that case the arguments are not evaluated.  See the
 descriptions of macros for more on this (@pxref{Macros}, and
 @pxref{Syntax Rules}).
@@ -318,7 +318,7 @@ the current input port if @var{port} is not specified.
 Any whitespace before the next token is discarded.
 @end deffn
 
-The behaviour of Guile's Scheme reader can be modified by manipulating
+The behavior of Guile's Scheme reader can be modified by manipulating
 its read options.
 
 @cindex options - read
@@ -359,7 +359,7 @@ unsets @code{square-brackets} on the port (@pxref{SRFI-105}).  There is
 currently no other way to access or set the per-port read options.
 
 The boolean options may be toggled with @code{read-enable} and
-@code{read-disable}. The non-boolean @code{keywords} option must be set
+@code{read-disable}.  The non-boolean @code{keywords} option must be set
 using @code{read-set!}.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} read-enable option-name
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ For more information on the @code{r7rs-symbols} option, see
 
 When something goes wrong with a Scheme program, the user will want to
 know how to fix it.  This starts with identifying where the error
-occured: we want to associate a source location with each component part
+occurred: we want to associate a source location with each component part
 of source code, and propagate that source location information through
 to the compiler or interpreter.
 
@@ -441,7 +441,7 @@ information.
 @node Scheme Write
 @subsection Writing Scheme Values
 
-Any scheme value may be written to a port. Not all values may be read
+Any scheme value may be written to a port.  Not all values may be read
 back in (@pxref{Scheme Read}), however.
 
 @rnindex write
@@ -475,7 +475,7 @@ affect the behavior of the Scheme printer.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} print-options [setting]
 Display the current settings of the read options.  If @var{setting} is
 omitted, only a short form of the current read options is
-printed. Otherwise if @var{setting} is the symbol @code{help}, a
+printed.  Otherwise if @var{setting} is the symbol @code{help}, a
 complete options description is displayed.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1044,7 +1044,7 @@ manipulation.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} parse-path path [tail]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_parse_path (path, tail)
 Parse @var{path}, which is expected to be a colon-separated string, into
-a list and return the resulting list with @var{tail} appended. If
+a list and return the resulting list with @var{tail} appended.  If
 @var{path} is @code{#f}, @var{tail} is returned.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1060,7 +1060,7 @@ returned.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} search-path path filename [extensions [require-exts?]]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_search_path (path, filename, rest)
 Search @var{path} for a directory containing a file named
-@var{filename}. The file must be readable, and not a directory.  If we
+@var{filename}.  The file must be readable, and not a directory.  If we
 find one, return its full filename; otherwise, return @code{#f}.  If
 @var{filename} is absolute, return it unchanged.  If given,
 @var{extensions} is a list of strings; for each directory in @var{path},
@@ -1136,7 +1136,7 @@ accomplish this in three steps.  First, the character encoding of the
 port should be set to ISO-8859-1 using @code{set-port-encoding!}.
 Then, the procedure @code{file-encoding}, described below, is used to
 scan for a coding declaration when reading from the port.  As a side
-effect, it rewinds the port after its scan is complete. After that,
+effect, it rewinds the port after its scan is complete.  After that,
 the port's character encoding should be set to the encoding returned
 by @code{file-encoding}, if any, again by using
 @code{set-port-encoding!}.  Then the code can be read as normal.
@@ -1339,14 +1339,14 @@ and space used by a piece of code.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} call-with-time-limit limit thunk limit-reached
 Call @var{thunk}, but cancel it if @var{limit} seconds of wall-clock
-time have elapsed.  If the computation is cancelled, call
+time have elapsed.  If the computation is canceled, call
 @var{limit-reached} in tail position.  @var{thunk} must not disable
 interrupts or prevent an abort via a @code{dynamic-wind} unwind handler.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} call-with-allocation-limit limit thunk limit-reached
 Call @var{thunk}, but cancel it if @var{limit} bytes have been
-allocated.  If the computation is cancelled, call @var{limit-reached} in
+allocated.  If the computation is canceled, call @var{limit-reached} in
 tail position.  @var{thunk} must not disable interrupts or prevent an
 abort via a @code{dynamic-wind} unwind handler.
 
@@ -1407,7 +1407,7 @@ defaults to @code{all-pure-bindings}.  This is the core of the
 sandbox: creating a scope for the expression that is @dfn{safe}.
 
 A safe sandbox module has two characteristics.  Firstly, it will not
-allow the expression being evaluated to avoid being cancelled due to
+allow the expression being evaluated to avoid being canceled due to
 time or allocation limits.  This ensures that the expression terminates
 in a timely fashion.
 
@@ -1604,7 +1604,7 @@ uses them internally to implement the @option{--listen} switch,
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} make-tcp-server-socket [#:host=#f] @
                           [#:addr] [#:port=37146]
 Return a stream socket bound to a given address @var{addr} and port
-number @var{port}. If the @var{host} is given, and @var{addr} is not,
+number @var{port}.  If the @var{host} is given, and @var{addr} is not,
 then the @var{host} string is converted to an address.  If neither is
 given, we use the loopback address.
 @end deffn
@@ -1628,7 +1628,7 @@ with no arguments.
 Closes the connection on all running server sockets.
 
 Please note that in the current implementation, the REPL threads are
-cancelled without unwinding their stacks.  If any of them are holding
+canceled without unwinding their stacks.  If any of them are holding
 mutexes or are within a critical section, the results are unspecified.
 @end deffn
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-foreign.texi b/doc/ref/api-foreign.texi
index 540fbbaf5..6a034761a 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-foreign.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-foreign.texi
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ Unless @var{library} denotes an absolute file name or otherwise contains
 a directory separator (@code{/}, and also @code{\} on Windows), Guile
 will search for the library in the directories listed in
 @var{search-paths}.  The default search path has three components, which
-can all be overriden by colon-delimited (semicolon on Windows)
+can all be overridden by colon-delimited (semicolon on Windows)
 environment variables:
 
 @table @env
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ We don't use libltdl now, essentially for flexibility and
 error-reporting reasons.  But, to keep this old use-case working, if
 @var{search-ltdl-library-path?} is true, we add each entry of
 @code{LTDL_LIBRARY_PATH} to the default extensions load path,
-additionally adding the @file{.libs} subdirextories for each entry, in
+additionally adding the @file{.libs} subdirectories for each entry, in
 case there are @file{.so} files there instead of alongside the
 @file{.la} files.
 @item GUILE_SYSTEM_EXTENSIONS_PATH
@@ -305,7 +305,7 @@ Note that the new primitives that the extension adds to Guile with
 @code{scm_c_define_gsubr} (@pxref{Primitive Procedures}) or with any of
 the other mechanisms are placed into the module that is current when the
 @code{scm_c_define_gsubr} is executed, so to be clear about what goes
-vwhere it's best to include the @code{load-extension} in a module, as
+where it's best to include the @code{load-extension} in a module, as
 above.  Alternately, the C code can use @code{scm_c_define_module} to
 specify which module is being created:
 
@@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ init_math_bessel ()
 
 And yet... if what we want is just the @code{j0} function, it seems like
 a lot of ceremony to have to compile a Guile-specific wrapper library
-complete with an initialization function and wraper module to allow
+complete with an initialization function and wrapper module to allow
 Guile users to call it.  There is another way, but to get there, we have
 to talk about function pointers and function types first.  @xref{Foreign
 Functions}, to skip to the good parts.
@@ -427,7 +427,7 @@ will try to use ``pointer object'' to refer to Scheme objects, and
 Create a pointer object from a pointer value.
 
 If @var{finalizer} is non-null, Guile arranges to call it on the pointer
-value at some point after the pointer object becomes collectable.
+value at some point after the pointer object becomes collectible.
 @end deftypefn
 
 @deftypefn {C Function} void* scm_to_pointer (SCM obj)
@@ -469,7 +469,7 @@ C types.
 @defvrx {Scheme Variable} complex-float
 These values represent the C numeric types of the specified sizes and
 signednesses. @code{complex-float} and @code{complex-double} stand for
-C99 @code{float _Complex} and @code{double _Complex} respecively.
+C99 @code{float _Complex} and @code{double _Complex} respectively.
 @end defvr
 
 In addition there are some convenience bindings for indicating types of
@@ -533,7 +533,7 @@ return two values, with @code{errno} as the second value.
 @end deffn
 
 Finally, in @code{(system foreign-library)} there is a convenient
-wrapper function, joining together @code{foreign-libary-pointer} and
+wrapper function, joining together @code{foreign-library-pointer} and
 @code{procedure->pointer}:
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} foreign-library-function lib name @
@@ -567,7 +567,7 @@ bessel)}:
                             #:arg-types (list double)))
 @end example
 
-That's it! No C at all.
+That's it!  No C at all.
 
 Before going on to more detailed examples, the next two sections discuss
 how to deal with data that is more complex than, say, @code{int8}.
@@ -704,7 +704,7 @@ In this example, @code{grab-bottle} is guaranteed to return a genuine
 @end deffn
 
 As another example, currently Guile has a variable, @code{scm_numptob},
-as part of its API. It is declared as a C @code{long}. So, to read its
+as part of its API.  It is declared as a C @code{long}. So, to read its
 value, we can do:
 
 @example
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-i18n.texi b/doc/ref/api-i18n.texi
index 7c49b0a23..91fde02be 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-i18n.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-i18n.texi
@@ -482,7 +482,7 @@ message strings (@pxref{Introduction,,, gettext, GNU @code{gettext}
 utilities}).
 
 Messages are collected in domains, so different libraries and programs
-maintain different message catalogues.  The @var{domain} parameter in
+maintain different message catalogs.  The @var{domain} parameter in
 the functions below is a string (it becomes part of the message
 catalog filename).
 
@@ -500,7 +500,7 @@ below.  @var{category} is optional and defaults to @code{LC_MESSAGES}
 
 Normal usage is for @var{msg} to be a literal string.
 @command{xgettext} can extract those from the source to form a message
-catalogue ready for translators (@pxref{xgettext Invocation,, Invoking
+catalog ready for translators (@pxref{xgettext Invocation,, Invoking
 the @command{xgettext} Program, gettext, GNU @code{gettext}
 utilities}).
 
@@ -539,12 +539,12 @@ with a plural form chosen appropriately for the number @var{n}.
 
 @var{msg} is the singular form, and @var{msgplural} the plural.  When
 no translation is available, @var{msg} is used if @math{@var{n} = 1},
-or @var{msgplural} otherwise.  When translated, the message catalogue
+or @var{msgplural} otherwise.  When translated, the message catalog
 can have a different rule, and can have more than two possible forms.
 
 As per @code{gettext} above, normal usage is for @var{msg} and
 @var{msgplural} to be literal strings, since @command{xgettext} can
-extract them from the source to build a message catalogue.  For
+extract them from the source to build a message catalog.  For
 example,
 
 @example
@@ -593,7 +593,7 @@ For example,
 When using Autoconf/Automake, an application should arrange for the
 configured @code{localedir} to get into the program (by substituting,
 or by generating a config file) and set that for its domain.  This
-ensures the catalogue can be found even when installed in a
+ensures the catalog can be found even when installed in a
 non-standard location.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -622,7 +622,7 @@ without any recoding.  For that reason source message strings are best
 as plain ASCII.
 
 Currently Guile has no understanding of multi-byte characters, and
-string functions won't recognise character boundaries in multi-byte
+string functions won't recognize character boundaries in multi-byte
 strings.  An application will at least be able to pass such strings
 through to some output though.  Perhaps this will change in the
 future.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-io.texi b/doc/ref/api-io.texi
index e263e2985..dee6d2754 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-io.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-io.texi
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
 * Line/Delimited::              Read and write lines or delimited text.
 * Default Ports::               Defaults for input, output and errors.
 * Port Types::                  Types of port and how to make them.
-* Venerable Port Interfaces::   Procedures from the last millenium.
+* Venerable Port Interfaces::   Procedures from the last millennium.
 * Using Ports from C::          Nice interfaces for C.
 * Non-Blocking I/O::            How Guile deals with EWOULDBLOCK.
 * BOM Handling::                Handling of Unicode byte order marks.
@@ -89,6 +89,7 @@ on interfaces to control port buffering.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} port? x
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_port_p (x)
 Return a boolean indicating whether @var{x} is a port.
+Equivalent to @code{(or (input-port? @var{x}) (output-port? @var{x}))}.
 @end deffn
 
 @rnindex input-port?
@@ -511,7 +512,7 @@ or until an end of file is reached.
 
 If a complete character is available before the next end of file,
 @code{get-char} returns that character and updates the input port to
-point past the character. If an end of file is reached before any
+point past the character.  If an end of file is reached before any
 character is read, @code{get-char} returns the end-of-file object.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -548,10 +549,10 @@ integer, representing the number of characters to be read.
 
 If @var{count} characters are available before end of file,
 @code{get-string-n} returns a string consisting of those @var{count}
-characters. If fewer characters are available before an end of file, but
+characters.  If fewer characters are available before an end of file, but
 one or more characters can be read, @code{get-string-n} returns a string
-containing those characters. In either case, the input port is updated
-to point just past the characters read. If no characters can be read
+containing those characters.  In either case, the input port is updated
+to point just past the characters read.  If no characters can be read
 before an end of file, the end-of-file object is returned.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -564,10 +565,10 @@ least $@var{start} + @var{count}$ characters.
 
 If @var{count} characters are available before an end of file, they are
 written into @var{string} starting at index @var{start}, and @var{count}
-is returned. If fewer characters are available before an end of file,
+is returned.  If fewer characters are available before an end of file,
 but one or more can be read, those characters are written into
 @var{string} starting at index @var{start} and the number of characters
-actually read is returned as an exact integer object. If no characters
+actually read is returned as an exact integer object.  If no characters
 can be read before an end of file, the end-of-file object is returned.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -576,7 +577,7 @@ Reads from @var{input-port} until an end of file, decoding characters in
 the same manner as @code{get-string-n} and @code{get-string-n!}.
 
 If characters are available before the end of file, a string containing
-all the characters decoded from that data are returned. If no character
+all the characters decoded from that data are returned.  If no character
 precedes the end of file, the end-of-file object is returned.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -587,10 +588,10 @@ character or end of file, decoding characters in the same manner as
 
 If a linefeed character is read, a string containing all of the text up
 to (but not including) the linefeed character is returned, and the port
-is updated to point just past the linefeed character. If an end of file
+is updated to point just past the linefeed character.  If an end of file
 is encountered before any linefeed character is read, but some
 characters have been read and decoded as characters, a string containing
-those characters is returned. If an end of file is encountered before
+those characters is returned.  If an end of file is encountered before
 any characters are read, the end-of-file object is returned.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -598,7 +599,7 @@ Finally, there are just two core procedures to write characters to a
 port.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} put-char port char
-Writes @var{char} to the port. The @code{put-char} procedure returns
+Writes @var{char} to the port.  The @code{put-char} procedure returns
 an unspecified value.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -633,7 +634,7 @@ Return the current column number or line number of @var{port}.
 @end deffn
 
 Port lines and positions are represented as 0-origin integers, which is
-to say that the the first character of the first line is line 0, column
+to say that the first character of the first line is line 0, column
 0.  However, when you display a line number, for example in an error
 message, we recommend you add 1 to get 1-origin integers.  This is
 because lines numbers traditionally start with 1, and that is what
@@ -754,7 +755,7 @@ line-buffered ports, respectively.  @xref{File Ports}, for more.
 
 Any buffered output data will be written out when the port is closed.
 To make sure to flush it at specific points in your program, use
-@code{force-otput}.
+@code{force-output}.
 
 @findex fflush
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} force-output [port]
@@ -978,15 +979,15 @@ Return the current input port.  This is the default port used
 by many input procedures.
 
 Initially this is the @dfn{standard input} in Unix and C terminology.
-When the standard input is a tty the port is unbuffered, otherwise
+When the standard input is a TTY the port is unbuffered, otherwise
 it's fully buffered.
 
 Unbuffered input is good if an application runs an interactive
 subprocess, since any type-ahead input won't go into Guile's buffer
 and be unavailable to the subprocess.
 
-Note that Guile buffering is completely separate from the tty ``line
-discipline''.  In the usual cooked mode on a tty Guile only sees a
+Note that Guile buffering is completely separate from the TTY ``line
+discipline''.  In the usual cooked mode on a TTY Guile only sees a
 line of input once the user presses @key{Return}.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -998,10 +999,10 @@ Return the current output port.  This is the default port used
 by many output procedures.
 
 Initially this is the @dfn{standard output} in Unix and C terminology.
-When the standard output is a tty this port is unbuffered, otherwise
+When the standard output is a TTY this port is unbuffered, otherwise
 it's fully buffered.
 
-Unbuffered output to a tty is good for ensuring progress output or a
+Unbuffered output to a TTY is good for ensuring progress output or a
 prompt is seen.  But an application which always prints whole lines
 could change to line buffered, or an application with a lot of output
 could go fully buffered and perhaps make explicit @code{force-output}
@@ -1014,7 +1015,7 @@ calls (@pxref{Buffering}) at selected points.
 Return the port to which errors and warnings should be sent.
 
 Initially this is the @dfn{standard error} in Unix and C terminology.
-When the standard error is a tty this port is unbuffered, otherwise
+When the standard error is a TTY this port is unbuffered, otherwise
 it's fully buffered.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1077,7 +1078,7 @@ See also @ref{Ports and File Descriptors, open}, for an interface
 to the Unix @code{open} system call.
 
 All file access uses the ``LFS'' large file support functions when
-available, so files bigger than 2 Gbytes (@math{2^31} bytes) can be
+available, so files bigger than 2 gibibytes (@math{2^31} bytes) can be
 read and written on a 32-bit system.
 
 Most systems have limits on how many files can be open, so it's
@@ -1354,7 +1355,7 @@ port set temporarily to a string port opened on the specified
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} open-input-string str
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_open_input_string (str)
 Take a string and return an input port that delivers characters
-from the string. The port can be closed by
+from the string.  The port can be closed by
 @code{close-input-port}, though its storage will be reclaimed
 by the garbage collector if it becomes inaccessible.
 @end deffn
@@ -1362,7 +1363,7 @@ by the garbage collector if it becomes inaccessible.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} open-output-string
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_open_output_string ()
 Return an output port that will accumulate characters for
-retrieval by @code{get-output-string}. The port can be closed
+retrieval by @code{get-output-string}.  The port can be closed
 by the procedure @code{close-output-port}, though its storage
 will be reclaimed by the garbage collector if it becomes
 inaccessible.
@@ -1717,7 +1718,7 @@ in-depth discussion.
 These methods must be implemented if the @code{#:read} or @code{#:write}
 method can return @code{#f}, and should return a non-negative integer
 file descriptor.  However they may be called explicitly by a user, for
-example to determine if a port may eventually be readable or writeable.
+example to determine if a port may eventually be readable or writable.
 If there is no associated file descriptor with the port, they should
 return @code{#f}.  The default implementation returns @code{#f}.
 @end deffn
@@ -1919,7 +1920,7 @@ together.  We document that set of primitives, design our internal
 interfaces around them, and recommend them to users.  As the R6RS I/O
 system is the most capable standard that Scheme has yet produced in this
 domain, we mostly recommend that; @code{(ice-9 binary-ports)} and
-@code{(ice-9 textual-ports)} are wholly modelled on @code{(rnrs io
+@code{(ice-9 textual-ports)} are wholly modeled on @code{(rnrs io
 ports)}.  Guile does not wholly copy R6RS, however; @xref{R6RS
 Incompatibilities}.
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-languages.texi b/doc/ref/api-languages.texi
index 763e79859..2114258e5 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-languages.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-languages.texi
@@ -8,13 +8,13 @@
 @section Support for Other Languages
 
 In addition to Scheme, a user may write a Guile program in an increasing
-number of other languages. Currently supported languages include Emacs
+number of other languages.  Currently supported languages include Emacs
 Lisp and ECMAScript.
 
 Guile is still fundamentally a Scheme, but it tries to support a wide
 variety of language building-blocks, so that other languages can be
-implemented on top of Guile. This allows users to write or extend
-applications in languages other than Scheme, too. This section describes
+implemented on top of Guile.  This allows users to write or extend
+applications in languages other than Scheme, too.  This section describes
 the languages that have been implemented.
 
 (For details on how to implement a language, @xref{Compiling to the
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ Guile: at the REPL, and programmatically, via @code{compile},
 
 The REPL is Guile's command prompt (@pxref{Using Guile Interactively}).
 The REPL has a concept of the ``current language'', which defaults to
-Scheme. The user may change that language, via the meta-command
+Scheme.  The user may change that language, via the meta-command
 @code{,language}.
 
 For example, the following meta-command enables Emacs Lisp input:
@@ -64,9 +64,9 @@ Lispy languages, which have a straightforward datum representation.
 Other languages that need more parsing are better dealt with as strings.
 
 The easiest way to deal with syntax-heavy language is with files, via
-@code{compile-file} and friends. However it is possible to invoke a
+@code{compile-file} and friends.  However it is possible to invoke a
 language's reader on a port, and then compile the resulting expression
-(which is a datum at that point). For more information,
+(which is a datum at that point).  For more information,
 @xref{Compilation}.
 
 For more details on introspecting aspects of different languages,
@@ -76,16 +76,16 @@ For more details on introspecting aspects of different languages,
 @subsection Emacs Lisp
 
 Emacs Lisp (Elisp) is a dynamically-scoped Lisp dialect used in the
-Emacs editor. @xref{top,,Overview,elisp,Emacs Lisp}, for more
+Emacs editor.  @xref{top,,Overview,elisp,Emacs Lisp}, for more
 information on Emacs Lisp.
 
 We hope that eventually Guile's implementation of Elisp will be good
-enough to replace Emacs' own implementation of Elisp. For that reason,
+enough to replace Emacs' own implementation of Elisp.  For that reason,
 we have thought long and hard about how to support the various features
 of Elisp in a performant and compatible manner.
 
 Readers familiar with Emacs Lisp might be curious about how exactly
-these various Elisp features are supported in Guile. The rest of this
+these various Elisp features are supported in Guile.  The rest of this
 section focuses on addressing these concerns of the Elisp elect.
 
 @menu
@@ -103,8 +103,8 @@ It is false, and it is the end-of-list; thus it is a boolean, and a list
 as well.
 
 Guile has chosen to support @code{nil} as a separate value, distinct
-from @code{#f} and @code{'()}. This allows existing Scheme and Elisp
-code to maintain their current semantics. @code{nil}, which in Elisp
+from @code{#f} and @code{'()}.  This allows existing Scheme and Elisp
+code to maintain their current semantics.  @code{nil}, which in Elisp
 would just be written and read as @code{nil}, in Scheme has the external
 representation @code{#nil}.
 
@@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ Emacs Lisp code, else return @code{#f}.
 @end deffn
 
 This decision to have @code{nil} as a low-level distinct value
-facilitates interoperability between the two languages. Guile has chosen
+facilitates interoperability between the two languages.  Guile has chosen
 to have Scheme deal with @code{nil} as follows:
 
 @example
@@ -146,14 +146,14 @@ scm_is_null (SCM_ELISP_NIL) @result{} 1
 
 In this way, a version of @code{fold} written in Scheme can correctly
 fold a function written in Elisp (or in fact any other language) over a
-nil-terminated list, as Elisp makes. The converse holds as well; a
+nil-terminated list, as Elisp makes.  The converse holds as well; a
 version of @code{fold} written in Elisp can fold over a
 @code{'()}-terminated list, as made by Scheme.
 
 On a low level, the bit representations for @code{#f}, @code{#t},
 @code{nil}, and @code{'()} are made in such a way that they differ by
 only one bit, and so a test for, for example, @code{#f}-or-@code{nil}
-may be made very efficiently. See @code{libguile/boolean.h}, for more
+may be made very efficiently.  See @code{libguile/boolean.h}, for more
 information.
 
 @subsubheading Equality
@@ -189,8 +189,8 @@ However, in Elisp, @code{'()}, @code{#f}, and @code{nil} are all
 @end example
 
 These choices facilitate interoperability between Elisp and Scheme code,
-but they are not perfect. Some code that is correct standard Scheme is
-not correct in the presence of a second false and null value. For
+but they are not perfect.  Some code that is correct standard Scheme is
+not correct in the presence of a second false and null value.  For
 example:
 
 @example
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ Here, @code{my-length} will raise an error if @var{l} is a
 Both of these examples are correct standard Scheme, but, depending on
 what they really want to do, they are not correct Guile Scheme.
 Correctly written, they would test the @emph{properties} of falsehood or
-nullity, not the individual members of that set. That is to say, they
+nullity, not the individual members of that set.  That is to say, they
 should use @code{not} or @code{null?} to test for falsehood or nullity,
 not @code{eq?} or @code{memv} or the like.
 
@@ -254,14 +254,14 @@ This problem has a mirror-image case in Elisp:
 @end example
 
 Guile can warn when compiling code that has equality comparisons with
-@code{#f}, @code{'()}, or @code{nil}. @xref{Compilation}, for details.
+@code{#f}, @code{'()}, or @code{nil}.  @xref{Compilation}, for details.
 
 @node Dynamic Binding
 @subsubsection Dynamic Binding
 
 In contrast to Scheme, which uses ``lexical scoping'', Emacs Lisp scopes
-its variables dynamically. Guile supports dynamic scoping with its
-``fluids'' facility. @xref{Fluids and Dynamic States}, for more
+its variables dynamically.  Guile supports dynamic scoping with its
+``fluids'' facility.  @xref{Fluids and Dynamic States}, for more
 information.
 
 @node Other Elisp Features
@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ information.
 
 Buffer-local and mode-local variables should be mentioned here, along
 with buckybits on characters, Emacs primitive data types, the
-Lisp-2-ness of Elisp, and other things. Contributions to the
+Lisp-2-ness of Elisp, and other things.  Contributions to the
 documentation are most welcome!
 
 @node ECMAScript
@@ -277,11 +277,11 @@ documentation are most welcome!
 
 @url{http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-262.pdf,ECMAScript}
 was not the first non-Schemey language implemented by Guile, but it was
-the first implemented for Guile's bytecode compiler. The goal was to
+the first implemented for Guile's bytecode compiler.  The goal was to
 support ECMAScript version 3.1, a relatively small language, but the
-implementor was completely irresponsible and got distracted by other
+implementer was completely irresponsible and got distracted by other
 things before finishing the standard library, and even some bits of the
-syntax. So, ECMAScript does deserve a mention in the manual, but it
+syntax.  So, ECMAScript does deserve a mention in the manual, but it
 doesn't deserve an endorsement until its implementation is completed,
 perhaps by some more responsible hacker.
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-macros.texi b/doc/ref/api-macros.texi
index f13ac0136..3f240209c 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-macros.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-macros.texi
@@ -9,13 +9,13 @@
 
 At its best, programming in Lisp is an iterative process of building up a
 language appropriate to the problem at hand, and then solving the problem in
-that language. Defining new procedures is part of that, but Lisp also allows
+that language.  Defining new procedures is part of that, but Lisp also allows
 the user to extend its syntax, with its famous @dfn{macros}.
 
 @cindex macros
 @cindex transformation
 Macros are syntactic extensions which cause the expression that they appear in
-to be transformed in some way @emph{before} being evaluated. In expressions that
+to be transformed in some way @emph{before} being evaluated.  In expressions that
 are intended for macro transformation, the identifier that names the relevant
 macro must appear as the first element, like this:
 
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ macro must appear as the first element, like this:
 @cindex DSL
 @cindex EDSL
 Macro expansion is a separate phase of evaluation, run before code is
-interpreted or compiled. A macro is a program that runs on programs, translating
+interpreted or compiled.  A macro is a program that runs on programs, translating
 an embedded language into core Scheme@footnote{These days such embedded
 languages are often referred to as @dfn{embedded domain-specific
 languages}, or EDSLs.}.
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ languages}, or EDSLs.}.
 @node Defining Macros
 @subsection Defining Macros
 
-A macro is a binding between a keyword and a syntax transformer. Since it's
+A macro is a binding between a keyword and a syntax transformer.  Since it's
 difficult to discuss @code{define-syntax} without discussing the format of
 transformers, consider the following example macro definition:
 
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ A @code{let-syntax} binding only exists at expansion-time.
 @end deffn
 
 A @code{define-syntax} form is valid anywhere a definition may appear: at the
-top-level, or locally. Just as a local @code{define} expands out to an instance
+top-level, or locally.  Just as a local @code{define} expands out to an instance
 of @code{letrec}, a local @code{define-syntax} expands out to
 @code{letrec-syntax}.
 
@@ -148,20 +148,21 @@ patterns, and as many templates as there are patterns.
 
 When the syntax expander sees the invocation of a @code{syntax-rules} macro, it
 matches the expression against the patterns, in order, and rewrites the
-expression using the template from the first matching pattern. If no pattern
+expression using the template from the first matching pattern.  If no pattern
 matches, a syntax error is signaled.
 
 @subsubsection Patterns
 
 We have already seen some examples of patterns in the previous section:
-@code{(unless condition exp ...)}, @code{(my-or exp)}, and so on. A pattern is
-structured like the expression that it is to match. It can have nested structure
-as well, like @code{(let ((var val) ...) exp exp* ...)}. Broadly speaking,
+@code{(unless condition exp ...)}, @code{(my-or exp)}, and so on.  A pattern is
+structured like the expression that it is to match.  It can have nested structure
+as well, like @code{(let ((var val) ...) exp exp* ...)}.  Broadly speaking,
 patterns are made of lists, improper lists, vectors, identifiers, and datums.
 Users can match a sequence of patterns using the ellipsis (@code{...}).
 
 Identifiers in a pattern are called @dfn{literals} if they are present in the
-@code{syntax-rules} literals list, and @dfn{pattern variables} otherwise. When
+@code{syntax-rules} literals list, and @dfn{pattern variables}
+otherwise.  When
 building up the macro output, the expander replaces instances of a pattern
 variable in the template with the matched subexpression.
 
@@ -261,7 +262,7 @@ auxiliary syntax definitions, as specified by R6RS and R7RS:
 @deffnx {Scheme Syntax} ...
 Auxiliary syntax definitions.
 
-These are defined as if with a macro that never matches, e.g.:
+These are defined with a macro that never matches, e.g.:
 
 @example
 (define-syntax else (syntax-rules ()))
@@ -437,14 +438,14 @@ Scheme}.
 
 @code{syntax-rules} macros are simple and clean, but do they have limitations.
 They do not lend themselves to expressive error messages: patterns either match
-or they don't. Their ability to generate code is limited to template-driven
+or they don't.  Their ability to generate code is limited to template-driven
 expansion; often one needs to define a number of helper macros to get real work
-done. Sometimes one wants to introduce a binding into the lexical context of the
-generated code; this is impossible with @code{syntax-rules}. Relatedly, they
+done.  Sometimes one wants to introduce a binding into the lexical context of the
+generated code; this is impossible with @code{syntax-rules}.  Relatedly, they
 cannot programmatically generate identifiers.
 
 The solution to all of these problems is to use @code{syntax-case} if you need
-its features. But if for some reason you're stuck with @code{syntax-rules}, you
+its features.  But if for some reason you're stuck with @code{syntax-rules}, you
 might enjoy Joe Marshall's
 @uref{https://web.archive.org/web/20121111060531/@/
 https://d655165b-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/evalapply/@/
@@ -463,8 +464,9 @@ Primer for the Merely Eccentric}.@footnote{Archived from
 worthy of Scheme.
 
 @deffn {Syntax} syntax-case syntax literals (pattern [guard] exp) @dots{}
-Match the syntax object @var{syntax} against the given patterns, in order. If a
-@var{pattern} matches, return the result of evaluating the associated @var{exp}.
+Match the syntax object @var{syntax} against the given patterns, in
+order.  If a @var{pattern} matches, return the result of evaluating the
+associated @var{exp}.
 @end deffn
 
 Compare the following definitions of @code{when}:
@@ -483,7 +485,7 @@ Compare the following definitions of @code{when}:
 @end example
 
 Clearly, the @code{syntax-case} definition is similar to its @code{syntax-rules}
-counterpart, and equally clearly there are some differences. The
+counterpart, and equally clearly there are some differences.  The
 @code{syntax-case} definition is wrapped in a @code{lambda}, a function of one
 argument; that argument is passed to the @code{syntax-case} invocation; and the
 ``return value'' of the macro has a @code{#'} prefix.
@@ -494,14 +496,14 @@ provide a way to destructure a @dfn{syntax object}, and to rebuild syntax
 objects as output.
 
 So the @code{lambda} wrapper is simply a leaky implementation detail, that
-syntax transformers are just functions that transform syntax to syntax. This
+syntax transformers are just functions that transform syntax to syntax.  This
 should not be surprising, given that we have already described macros as
 ``programs that write programs''. @code{syntax-case} is simply a way to take
 apart and put together program text, and to be a valid syntax transformer it
 needs to be wrapped in a procedure.
 
 Unlike traditional Lisp macros (@pxref{Defmacros}), @code{syntax-case} macros
-transform syntax objects, not raw Scheme forms. Recall the naive expansion of
+transform syntax objects, not raw Scheme forms.  Recall the naive expansion of
 @code{my-or} given in the previous section:
 
 @example
@@ -514,7 +516,7 @@ transform syntax objects, not raw Scheme forms. Recall the naive expansion of
 @end example
 
 Raw Scheme forms simply don't have enough information to distinguish the first
-two @code{t} instances in @code{(if t t t)} from the third @code{t}. So instead
+two @code{t} instances in @code{(if t t t)} from the third @code{t}.  So instead
 of representing identifiers as symbols, the syntax expander represents
 identifiers as annotated syntax objects, attaching such information to those
 syntax objects as is needed to maintain referential transparency.
@@ -523,8 +525,9 @@ syntax objects as is needed to maintain referential transparency.
 Create a syntax object wrapping @var{form} within the current lexical context.
 @end deffn
 
-Syntax objects are typically created internally to the process of expansion, but
-it is possible to create them outside of syntax expansion:
+Syntax objects are typically created internally to facilitate the
+process of expansion, but it is possible to create them outside of
+syntax expansion:
 
 @example
 (syntax (foo bar baz))
@@ -545,18 +548,18 @@ output from a @code{syntax-case} expression.
 
 It is not strictly necessary for a @code{syntax-case} expression to return a
 syntax object, because @code{syntax-case} expressions can be used in helper
-functions, or otherwise used outside of syntax expansion itself. However a
+functions, or otherwise used outside of syntax expansion itself.  However a
 syntax transformer procedure must return a syntax object, so most uses of
 @code{syntax-case} do end up returning syntax objects.
 
 Here in this case, the form that built the return value was @code{(syntax (+ exp
-1))}. The interesting thing about this is that within a @code{syntax}
+1))}.  The interesting thing about this is that within a @code{syntax}
 expression, any appearance of a pattern variable is substituted into the
 resulting syntax object, carrying with it all relevant metadata from the source
 expression, such as lexical identity and source location.
 
 Indeed, a pattern variable may only be referenced from inside a @code{syntax}
-form. The syntax expander would raise an error when defining @code{add1} if it
+form.  The syntax expander would raise an error when defining @code{add1} if it
 found @var{exp} referenced outside a @code{syntax} form.
 
 Since @code{syntax} appears frequently in macro-heavy code, it has a special
@@ -564,7 +567,7 @@ reader macro: @code{#'}. @code{#'foo} is transformed by the reader into
 @code{(syntax foo)}, just as @code{'foo} is transformed into @code{(quote foo)}.
 
 The pattern language used by @code{syntax-case} is conveniently the same
-language used by @code{syntax-rules}. Given this, Guile actually defines
+language used by @code{syntax-rules}.  Given this, Guile actually defines
 @code{syntax-rules} in terms of @code{syntax-case}:
 
 @example
@@ -584,13 +587,13 @@ And that's that.
 
 The examples we have shown thus far could just as well have been expressed with
 @code{syntax-rules}, and have just shown that @code{syntax-case} is more
-verbose, which is true. But there is a difference: @code{syntax-case} creates
+verbose, which is true.  But there is a difference: @code{syntax-case} creates
 @emph{procedural} macros, giving the full power of Scheme to the macro expander.
 This has many practical applications.
 
-A common desire is to be able to match a form only if it is an identifier. This
-is impossible with @code{syntax-rules}, given the datum matching forms. But with
-@code{syntax-case} it is easy:
+A common desire is to be able to match a form only if it is an
+identifier.  This is impossible with @code{syntax-rules}, given the
+datum matching forms.  But with @code{syntax-case} it is easy:
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} identifier? syntax-object
 Returns @code{#t} if @var{syntax-object} is an identifier, or @code{#f}
@@ -877,7 +880,7 @@ objects.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} syntax-local-binding id [#:resolve-syntax-parameters?=#t]
-Resolve the identifer @var{id}, a syntax object, within the current
+Resolve the identifier @var{id}, a syntax object, within the current
 lexical environment, and return two values, the binding type and a
 binding value.  The binding type is a symbol, which may be one of the
 following:
@@ -1104,7 +1107,7 @@ written to discriminate on the form in the operator position.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} make-variable-transformer transformer
 Mark the @var{transformer} procedure as being a ``variable
-transformer''. In practice this means that, when bound to a syntactic
+transformer''.  In practice this means that, when bound to a syntactic
 keyword, it may detect references to that keyword on the left-hand-side
 of a @code{set!}.
 
@@ -1130,7 +1133,7 @@ There is an extension to identifier-syntax which allows it to handle the
 @code{set!} case as well:
 
 @deffn {Syntax} identifier-syntax (var exp1) ((set! var val) exp2)
-Create a variable transformer. The first clause is used for references
+Create a variable transformer.  The first clause is used for references
 to the variable in operator or operand position, and the second for
 appearances of the variable on the left-hand-side of an assignment.
 
@@ -1166,7 +1169,7 @@ With syntax parameters, instead of introducing the binding
 unhygienically each time, we instead create one binding for the keyword,
 which we can then adjust later when we want the keyword to have a
 different meaning.  As no new bindings are introduced, hygiene is
-preserved. This is similar to the dynamic binding mechanisms we have at
+preserved.  This is similar to the dynamic binding mechanisms we have at
 run-time (@pxref{SRFI-39, parameters}), except that the dynamic binding
 only occurs during macro expansion.  The code after macro expansion
 remains lexically scoped.
@@ -1192,7 +1195,7 @@ their @var{transformer} @dots{}, in the expansion of the @var{exp}
 @dots{} forms.  Each @var{keyword} must be bound to a syntax-parameter.
 @code{syntax-parameterize} differs from @code{let-syntax}, in that the
 binding is not shadowed, but adjusted, and so uses of the keyword in the
-expansion of @var{exp} @dots{} use the new transformers. This is
+expansion of @var{exp} @dots{} use the new transformers.  This is
 somewhat similar to how @code{parameterize} adjusts the values of
 regular parameters, rather than creating new bindings.
 
@@ -1234,13 +1237,13 @@ program are available for the macro to use?
 
 The default answer to this question is that when you import a module (via
 @code{define-module} or @code{use-modules}), that module will be loaded up at
-expansion-time, as well as at run-time. Additionally, top-level syntactic
+expansion-time, as well as at run-time.  Additionally, top-level syntactic
 definitions within one compilation unit made by @code{define-syntax} are also
 evaluated at expansion time, in the order that they appear in the compilation
 unit (file).
 
 But if a syntactic definition needs to call out to a normal procedure at
-expansion-time, it might well need need special declarations to indicate that
+expansion-time, it might well need special declarations to indicate that
 the procedure should be made available at expansion-time.
 
 For example, the following code tries to embed a compilation
@@ -1252,7 +1255,7 @@ not in a file, as it cannot be byte-compiled:
 (use-modules (srfi srfi-19))
 (define start-date (date->string (current-date)))
 (define-syntax *compilation-date*
- (lambda (sintax)
+ (lambda (syntax)
     start-date))
 (display *compilation-date*)
 (newline)
@@ -1269,7 +1272,7 @@ The fix is to use @code{eval-when}.
 (eval-when (expand load eval)
   (define start-date (date->string (current-date))))
 (define-syntax *compilation-date*
- (lambda (sintax)
+ (lambda (syntax)
     start-date))
 (display *compilation-date*)
 (newline)
@@ -1369,7 +1372,7 @@ macro definition to be present at compile time as well, so you pass
 Compiler}.
 
 It's a terrible interface; we know.  The macroexpander is somewhat
-tricksy regarding modes, so unless you are building a macro-expanding
+tricky regarding modes, so unless you are building a macro-expanding
 tool, we suggest to avoid invoking it directly.
 
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-memory.texi b/doc/ref/api-memory.texi
index ce0187b14..9cf0fdc9a 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-memory.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-memory.texi
@@ -36,11 +36,11 @@ automatically as needed.
 @deftypefn {C Function} SCM scm_gc_protect_object (SCM @var{obj})
 Protects @var{obj} from being freed by the garbage collector, when it
 otherwise might be.  When you are done with the object, call
-@code{scm_gc_unprotect_object} on the object. Calls to
+@code{scm_gc_unprotect_object} on the object.  Calls to
 @code{scm_gc_protect_object}/@code{scm_gc_unprotect_object} can be nested, and
 the object remains protected until it has been unprotected as many times
-as it was protected. It is an error to unprotect an object more times
-than it has been protected. Returns the SCM object it was passed.
+as it was protected.  It is an error to unprotect an object more times
+than it has been protected.  Returns the SCM object it was passed.
 
 Note that storing @var{obj} in a C global variable has the same
 effect@footnote{In Guile up to version 1.8, C global variables were not
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ object from being freed.}.
 @deftypefn {C Function} SCM scm_gc_unprotect_object (SCM @var{obj})
 
 Unprotects an object from the garbage collector which was protected by
-@code{scm_gc_unprotect_object}. Returns the SCM object it was passed.
+@code{scm_gc_unprotect_object}.  Returns the SCM object it was passed.
 @end deftypefn
 
 @deftypefn {C Function} SCM scm_permanent_object (SCM @var{obj})
@@ -60,8 +60,8 @@ Unprotects an object from the garbage collector which was protected by
 Similar to @code{scm_gc_protect_object} in that it causes the
 collector to always mark the object, except that it should not be
 nested (only call @code{scm_permanent_object} on an object once), and
-it has no corresponding unpermanent function. Once an object is
-declared permanent, it will never be freed. Returns the SCM object it
+it has no corresponding unpermanent function.  Once an object is
+declared permanent, it will never be freed.  Returns the SCM object it
 was passed.
 @end deftypefn
 
@@ -261,14 +261,14 @@ preprocessor macro was defined when Guile was compiled.
 @subsection Weak References
 
 [FIXME: This chapter is based on Mikael Djurfeldt's answer to a
-question by Michael Livshin. Any mistakes are not theirs, of course. ]
+question by Michael Livshin.  Any mistakes are not theirs, of course. ]
 
 Weak references let you attach bookkeeping information to data so that
 the additional information automatically disappears when the original
-data is no longer in use and gets garbage collected. In a weak key hash,
+data is no longer in use and gets garbage collected.  In a weak key hash,
 the hash entry for that key disappears as soon as the key is no longer
-referenced from anywhere else. For weak value hashes, the same happens
-as soon as the value is no longer in use. Entries in a doubly weak hash
+referenced from anywhere else.  For weak value hashes, the same happens
+as soon as the value is no longer in use.  Entries in a doubly weak hash
 disappear when either the key or the value are not used anywhere else
 anymore.
 
@@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ they constitute a doubly-weak table has to be used.
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_weak_key_hash_table (size)
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_weak_value_hash_table (size)
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_doubly_weak_hash_table (size)
-Return a weak hash table with @var{size} buckets. As with any
+Return a weak hash table with @var{size} buckets.  As with any
 hash table, choosing a good size for the table requires some
 caution.
 
@@ -334,7 +334,7 @@ leak.  The reverse is true for weak value tables.
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_weak_value_hash_table_p (obj)
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_doubly_weak_hash_table_p (obj)
 Return @code{#t} if @var{obj} is the specified weak hash
-table. Note that a doubly weak hash table is neither a weak key
+table.  Note that a doubly weak hash table is neither a weak key
 nor a weak value hash table.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -343,9 +343,9 @@ nor a weak value hash table.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} make-weak-vector size [fill]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_weak_vector (size, fill)
-Return a weak vector with @var{size} elements. If the optional
+Return a weak vector with @var{size} elements.  If the optional
 argument @var{fill} is given, all entries in the vector will be
-set to @var{fill}. The default value for @var{fill} is the
+set to @var{fill}.  The default value for @var{fill} is the
 empty list.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -419,7 +419,7 @@ keys, or a value in a hash table with weak values does not prevent an
 object from being returned by a guardian.  But as long as an object
 can be returned from a guardian it will not be removed from such a
 weak vector or hash table.  In other words, a weak link does not
-prevent an object from being considered collectable, but being inside
+prevent an object from being considered collectible, but being inside
 a guardian prevents a weak link from being broken.
 
 A key in a weak key hash table can be thought of as having a strong
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-modules.texi b/doc/ref/api-modules.texi
index 0171edfb1..9f2bba02d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-modules.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-modules.texi
@@ -360,7 +360,7 @@ in the sense of @code{#:replace}.
 @item #:version @var{list}
 @cindex module version
 Specify a version for the module in the form of @var{list}, a list of
-zero or more exact, nonnegative integers.  The corresponding 
+zero or more exact, non-negative integers.  The corresponding
 @code{#:version} option in the @code{use-modules} form allows callers
 to restrict the value of this option in various ways.
 
@@ -510,7 +510,7 @@ a declared version specifier of the same form as the one described in
 R6RS (@pxref{Library form, R6RS Library Form,, r6rs, The Revised^6 
 Report on the Algorithmic Language Scheme}).  By using the 
 @code{#:version} keyword in a @code{define-module} form, a module may
-specify a version as a list of zero or more exact, nonnegative integers.
+specify a version as a list of zero or more exact, non-negative integers.
 
 This version can then be used to locate the module during the module
 search process.  Client modules and callers of the @code{use-modules} 
@@ -536,7 +536,7 @@ in which @var{sub-version-reference} is in turn one of:
  (not @var{sub-version-reference})
 @end lisp
 
-in which @var{sub-version} is an exact, nonnegative integer as above. A
+in which @var{sub-version} is an exact, non-negative integer as above. A
 version reference matches a declared module version if each element of
 the version reference matches a corresponding element of the module 
 version, according to the following rules:
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-options.texi b/doc/ref/api-options.texi
index 4a9125e42..161c46794 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-options.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-options.texi
@@ -18,12 +18,12 @@ installation directories, configuration flags that control pieces of
 functionality being included or left out, etc.
 
 @item
-differences in dynamically loaded code --- behaviour and features
+differences in dynamically loaded code --- behavior and features
 provided by modules that can be dynamically loaded into a running Guile
 
 @item
 different runtime options --- some of the options that are provided for
-controlling Guile's behaviour may be set differently.
+controlling Guile's behavior may be set differently.
 @end itemize
 
 Guile provides ``introspective'' variables and procedures to query all
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ documentation on what the options mean.
 @menu
 * Build Config::                Build and installation configuration.
 * Feature Tracking::            Available features in the Guile process.
-* Runtime Options::             Controlling Guile's runtime behaviour.
+* Runtime Options::             Controlling Guile's runtime behavior.
 @end menu
 
 
@@ -349,7 +349,7 @@ and friends (@pxref{Records}).
 
 Although these tables may seem exhaustive, it is probably unwise in
 practice to rely on them, as the correspondences between feature symbols
-and available procedures/behaviour are not strictly defined.  If you are
+and available procedures/behavior are not strictly defined.  If you are
 writing code that needs to check for the existence of some procedure, it
 is probably safer to do so directly using the @code{defined?} procedure
 than to test for the corresponding feature using @code{provided?}.
@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ than to test for the corresponding feature using @code{provided?}.
 @node Runtime Options
 @subsection Runtime Options
 
-There are a number of runtime options available for paramaterizing
+There are a number of runtime options available for parameterizing
 built-in procedures, like @code{read}, and built-in behavior, like what
 happens on an uncaught error.
 
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-peg.texi b/doc/ref/api-peg.texi
index 82e2758b4..a6ab7080d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-peg.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-peg.texi
@@ -716,7 +716,7 @@ This produces rather pretty parse trees:
 
 Notice that when there's no entry in a field (e.g. @code{nameORcomment}
 for messagebus) the symbol is inserted.  This is the ``don't throw away
-any information'' rule---we succesfully matched a @code{nameORcomment}
+any information'' rule---we successfully matched a @code{nameORcomment}
 of 0 characters (since we used @code{*} when defining it).  This is
 usually what you want, because it allows you to e.g. use @code{list-ref}
 to pull out elements (since they all have known offsets).
@@ -1013,19 +1013,19 @@ First, any string PEG is expanded into an s-expression PEG by the code
 in the @code{(ice-9 peg string-peg)} module.
 
 Then, the s-expression PEG that results is compiled into a parsing
-function by the @code{(ice-9 peg codegen)} module. In particular, the
-function @code{compile-peg-pattern} is called on the s-expression. It then
+function by the @code{(ice-9 peg codegen)} module.  In particular, the
+function @code{compile-peg-pattern} is called on the s-expression.  It then
 decides what to do based on the form it is passed.
 
 The PEG syntax can be expanded by providing @code{compile-peg-pattern} more
-options for what to do with its forms. The extended syntax will be
+options for what to do with its forms.  The extended syntax will be
 associated with a symbol, for instance @code{my-parsing-form}, and will
 be called on all PEG expressions of the form
 @lisp
 (my-parsing-form ...)
 @end lisp
 
-The parsing function should take two arguments. The first will be a
+The parsing function should take two arguments.  The first will be a
 syntax object containing a list with all of the arguments to the form
 (but not the form's name), and the second will be the
 @code{capture-type} argument that is passed to @code{define-peg-pattern}.
@@ -1033,5 +1033,5 @@ syntax object containing a list with all of the arguments to the form
 New functions can be registered by calling @code{(add-peg-compiler!
 symbol function)}, where @code{symbol} is the symbol that will indicate
 a form of this type and @code{function} is the code generating function
-described above. The function @code{add-peg-compiler!} is exported from
+described above.  The function @code{add-peg-compiler!} is exported from
 the @code{(ice-9 peg codegen)} module.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-procedures.texi b/doc/ref/api-procedures.texi
index 0b24c1002..d16ed730d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-procedures.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-procedures.texi
@@ -127,19 +127,19 @@ required.
 @subsection Compiled Procedures
 
 The evaluation strategy given in @ref{Lambda} describes how procedures
-are @dfn{interpreted}. Interpretation operates directly on expanded
+are @dfn{interpreted}.  Interpretation operates directly on expanded
 Scheme source code, recursively calling the evaluator to obtain the
 value of nested expressions.
 
-Most procedures are compiled, however. This means that Guile has done
+Most procedures are compiled, however.  This means that Guile has done
 some pre-computation on the procedure, to determine what it will need to
-do each time the procedure runs. Compiled procedures run faster than
+do each time the procedure runs.  Compiled procedures run faster than
 interpreted procedures.
 
 Loading files is the normal way that compiled procedures come to
-being. If Guile sees that a file is uncompiled, or that its compiled
+being.  If Guile sees that a file is uncompiled, or that its compiled
 file is out of date, it will attempt to compile the file when it is
-loaded, and save the result to disk. Procedures can be compiled at
+loaded, and save the result to disk.  Procedures can be compiled at
 runtime as well. @xref{Read/Load/Eval/Compile}, for more information
 on runtime compilation.
 
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ Properties}).  In addition, there are a few more accessors for low-level
 details on programs.
 
 Most people won't need to use the routines described in this section,
-but it's good to have them documented. You'll have to include the
+but it's good to have them documented.  You'll have to include the
 appropriate module first, though:
 
 @example
@@ -214,9 +214,9 @@ impose a runtime performance penalty.
 Source location annotations for programs, along with their accessors.
 
 Source location information propagates through the compiler and ends
-up being serialized to the program's metadata. This information is
+up being serialized to the program's metadata.  This information is
 keyed by the offset of the instruction pointer within the object code
-of the program. Specifically, it is keyed on the @code{ip} @emph{just
+of the program.  Specifically, it is keyed on the @code{ip} @emph{just
 following} an instruction, so that backtraces can find the source
 location of a call that is in progress.
 @end deffn
@@ -233,24 +233,24 @@ location of a call that is in progress.
 @deffnx {Scheme Procedure} arity:allow-other-keys? arity
 Accessors for a representation of the ``arity'' of a program.
 
-The normal case is that a procedure has one arity. For example,
-@code{(lambda (x) x)}, takes one required argument, and that's it. One
+The normal case is that a procedure has one arity.  For example,
+@code{(lambda (x) x)}, takes one required argument, and that's it.  One
 could access that number of required arguments via @code{(arity:nreq
-(program-arities (lambda (x) x)))}. Similarly, @code{arity:nopt} gets
+(program-arities (lambda (x) x)))}.  Similarly, @code{arity:nopt} gets
 the number of optional arguments, and @code{arity:rest?} returns a true
 value if the procedure has a rest arg.
 
 @code{arity:kw} returns a list of @code{(@var{kw} . @var{idx})} pairs,
-if the procedure has keyword arguments. The @var{idx} refers to the
+if the procedure has keyword arguments.  The @var{idx} refers to the
 @var{idx}th local variable; @xref{Variables and the VM}, for more
-information. Finally @code{arity:allow-other-keys?} returns a true
+information.  Finally @code{arity:allow-other-keys?} returns a true
 value if other keys are allowed. @xref{Optional Arguments}, for more
 information.
 
-So what about @code{arity:start} and @code{arity:end}, then? They
+So what about @code{arity:start} and @code{arity:end}, then?  They
 return the range of bytes in the program's bytecode for which a given
-arity is valid. You see, a procedure can actually have more than one
-arity. The question, ``what is a procedure's arity'' only really makes
+arity is valid.  You see, a procedure can actually have more than one
+arity.  The question, ``what is a procedure's arity'' only really makes
 sense at certain points in the program, delimited by these
 @code{arity:start} and @code{arity:end} values.
 @end deffn
@@ -301,7 +301,7 @@ to give names to the fixed number of arguments, but the remaining
 
 For this reason, Guile provides an extension to @code{lambda},
 @code{lambda*}, which allows the user to define procedures with
-optional and keyword arguments. In addition, Guile's virtual machine
+optional and keyword arguments.  In addition, Guile's virtual machine
 has low-level support for optional and keyword argument dispatch.
 Calls to procedures with optional and keyword arguments can be made
 cheaply, without allocating a rest list.
@@ -584,7 +584,7 @@ Rest lists can be useful with @code{case-lambda}:
 @end lisp
 
 @fnindex case-lambda*
-Also, for completeness. Guile defines @code{case-lambda*} as well,
+Also, for completeness.  Guile defines @code{case-lambda*} as well,
 which is like @code{case-lambda}, except with @code{lambda*} clauses.
 A @code{case-lambda*} clause matches if the arguments fill the
 required arguments, but are not too many for the optional and/or rest
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi b/doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi
index 115943dab..d79808049 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-scheduling.texi
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ Return @code{#t} if @var{thread} has exited, or @code{#f} otherwise.
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} yield
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_yield (thread)
 If one or more threads are waiting to execute, calling yield forces an
-immediate context switch to one of them. Otherwise, yield has no effect.
+immediate context switch to one of them.  Otherwise, yield has no effect.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} cancel-thread thread . values
@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ other threads, which might not be what you want.  Or, it might escape
 via explicit reification via @code{current-dynamic-state}.
 
 Of course, this dynamic scoping might be exactly what you want; that's
-why fluids and parameters work this way, and is what you want for for
+why fluids and parameters work this way, and is what you want for
 many common parameters such as the current input and output ports, the
 current locale conversion parameters, and the like.  Perhaps this is the
 case for most parameters, even.  If your use case for thread-local
@@ -205,7 +205,7 @@ not inherit thread-local fluid values from the parent thread.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} fluid-thread-local? fluid
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_fluid_thread_local_p (fluid)
-Return @code{#t} if the fluid @var{fluid} is is thread-local, or
+Return @code{#t} if the fluid @var{fluid} is thread-local, or
 @code{#f} otherwise.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -258,11 +258,11 @@ C signal handlers.)
 
 Though an interrupt procedure can have any side effect permitted to
 Guile code, asynchronous interrupts are generally used either for
-profiling or for prematurely cancelling a computation.  The former case
+profiling or for prematurely canceling a computation.  The former case
 is mostly transparent to the program being run, by design, but the
 latter case can introduce bugs.  Like finalizers (@pxref{Foreign Object
 Memory Management}), asynchronous interrupts introduce concurrency in a
-program.  An asyncronous interrupt can run in the middle of some
+program.  An asynchronous interrupt can run in the middle of some
 mutex-protected operation, for example, and potentially corrupt the
 program's state.
 
@@ -338,7 +338,7 @@ and that it should avoid waiting.
 @deftypefn {C Function} int scm_c_prepare_to_wait_on_cond (scm_i_pthread_mutex_t *mutex, scm_i_pthread_cond_t *cond)
 Inform Guile that the current thread is about to sleep, and that if an
 asynchronous interrupt is signaled on this thread, Guile should wake up
-the thread by acquiring @var{mutex} and signalling @var{cond}.  The
+the thread by acquiring @var{mutex} and signaling @var{cond}.  The
 caller must already hold @var{mutex} and only drop it as part of the
 @code{pthread_cond_wait} call.  Returns zero if the prepare succeeded,
 or nonzero if the thread already has a pending async and that it should
@@ -492,7 +492,7 @@ re-entry, and you might not have to worry about early exit either.
 
 However, do consider the possibility of asynchronous interrupts
 (@pxref{Asyncs}).  If the user interrupts your code interactively, that
-can cause an exception; or your thread might be cancelled, which does
+can cause an exception; or your thread might be canceled, which does
 the same; or the user could be running your code under some pre-emptive
 system that periodically causes lightweight task switching.  (Guile does
 not currently include such a system, but it's possible to implement as a
@@ -526,7 +526,7 @@ Finally, calling @code{make-mutex} with the symbol
 @code{allow-external-unlock} creates an unowned mutex.  An unowned mutex
 is like a standard mutex, except that it can be unlocked by any thread.
 A corollary of this behavior is that a thread's attempt to lock a mutex
-that it already owns will block instead of signalling an error, as it
+that it already owns will block instead of signaling an error, as it
 could be that some other thread unlocks the mutex, allowing the owner
 thread to proceed.  This kind of mutex is a bit strange and is here for
 use by SRFI-18.
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi b/doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi
index 0195748ae..2967c95f4 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-undocumented.texi
@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ Unmemoize the memoized expression @var{m},
 @deffnx {Scheme Procedure} doubly-weak-alist-vector? obj
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_weak_key_alist_vector_p (obj)
 Return @code{#t} if @var{obj} is the specified weak hash
-table. Note that a doubly weak hash table is neither a weak key
+table.  Note that a doubly weak hash table is neither a weak key
 nor a weak value hash table.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ nor a weak value hash table.
 @deffnx {Scheme Procedure} make-weak-value-alist-vector size
 @deffnx {Scheme Procedure} make-doubly-weak-alist-vector size
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_make_weak_key_alist_vector (size)
-Return a weak hash table with @var{size} buckets. As with any
+Return a weak hash table with @var{size} buckets.  As with any
 hash table, choosing a good size for the table requires some
 caution.
 
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ Return the obarray that is used for all new bindings before the module system is
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} standard-interface-eval-closure module
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_standard_interface_eval_closure (module)
-Return a interface eval closure for the module @var{module}. Such a closure does not allow new bindings to be added.
+Return a interface eval closure for the module @var{module}.  Such a closure does not allow new bindings to be added.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} env-module env
@@ -226,7 +226,7 @@ implemented by the C function "scm_single_thread_p"
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} set-debug-cell-accesses! flag
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_set_debug_cell_accesses_x (flag)
-This function is used to turn on checking for a debug version of GUILE. This version does not support this functionality
+This function is used to turn on checking for a debug version of GUILE.  This version does not support this functionality
 
 @end deffn
 
@@ -237,12 +237,12 @@ Return an eval closure for the module @var{module}.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} mask-signals
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_mask_signals ()
-Mask signals. The returned value is not specified.
+Mask signals.  The returned value is not specified.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} unmask-signals
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_unmask_signals ()
-Unmask signals. The returned value is not specified.
+Unmask signals.  The returned value is not specified.
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} noop . args
diff --git a/doc/ref/api-utility.texi b/doc/ref/api-utility.texi
index 3532bbb84..5f2e67fa4 100644
--- a/doc/ref/api-utility.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/api-utility.texi
@@ -501,7 +501,7 @@ Once the procedures have been added, we can invoke the hook using
 @end lisp
 
 Note that the procedures are called in the reverse of the order with
-which they were added.  This is because the default behaviour of
+which they were added.  This is because the default behavior of
 @code{add-hook!} is to add its procedure to the @emph{front} of the
 hook's procedure list.  You can force @code{add-hook!} to add its
 procedure to the @emph{end} of the list instead by providing a third
diff --git a/doc/ref/expect.texi b/doc/ref/expect.texi
index 140fd477e..b5631675d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/expect.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/expect.texi
@@ -64,10 +64,10 @@ match.  E.g.,
 The order of the substrings corresponds to the order in which the
 opening brackets occur.
 
-A number of variables can be used to control the behaviour
+A number of variables can be used to control the behavior
 of @code{expect} (and @code{expect-strings}).
 Most have default top-level bindings to the value @code{#f}, 
-which produces the default behaviour.
+which produces the default behavior.
 They can be redefined at the
 top level or locally bound in a form enclosing the expect expression.
 
@@ -142,6 +142,6 @@ of the file:
 @end lisp
 
 The control variables described for @code{expect-strings} also
-influence the behaviour of @code{expect}, with the exception of 
+influence the behavior of @code{expect}, with the exception of
 variables whose names begin with @code{expect-strings-}.
 @end defmac
diff --git a/doc/ref/goops.texi b/doc/ref/goops.texi
index 91902e492..faf32446d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/goops.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/goops.texi
@@ -1801,7 +1801,7 @@ instances of an application-defined class --- and an understanding of
 the MOP makes it much easier to explain such customizations in a precise
 way.  And at a deeper level, understanding the MOP is a key part of
 understanding GOOPS, and of taking full advantage of GOOPS' power, by
-customizing the behaviour of GOOPS itself.
+customizing the behavior of GOOPS itself.
 
 @menu
 * Metaobjects and the Metaobject Protocol::
@@ -1833,18 +1833,18 @@ Of these entities, GOOPS represents classes, generic functions and
 methods as ``metaobjects''.  In other words, the values in a GOOPS
 program that describe classes, generic functions and methods, are
 themselves instances (or ``objects'') of special GOOPS classes that
-encapsulate the behaviour, respectively, of classes, generic functions,
+encapsulate the behavior, respectively, of classes, generic functions,
 and methods.
 
 (The other two entities are slot definitions and instances.  Slot
 definitions are not strictly instances, but every slot definition is
-associated with a GOOPS class that specifies the behaviour of the slot
+associated with a GOOPS class that specifies the behavior of the slot
 as regards accessibility and protection from garbage collection.
 Instances are of course objects in the usual sense, and there is no
 benefit from thinking of them as metaobjects.)
 
 The ``metaobject protocol'' (or ``MOP'') is the specification of the
-generic functions which determine the behaviour of these metaobjects and
+generic functions which determine the behavior of these metaobjects and
 the circumstances in which these generic functions are invoked.
 
 For a concrete example of what this means, consider how GOOPS calculates
@@ -1880,7 +1880,7 @@ performs the slot calculation.
 @end itemize
 
 In other words, rather than being hardcoded in @code{define-class}, the
-default behaviour of class definition is encapsulated by generic
+default behavior of class definition is encapsulated by generic
 function methods that are specialized for the class @code{<class>}.
 
 It is possible to create a new class that inherits from @code{<class>},
@@ -1894,7 +1894,7 @@ with the new @code{initialize} method.  Thus the default slot
 calculation, as well as any other aspect of the new class's relationship
 with its superclasses, can be modified or overridden.
 
-In a similar way, the behaviour of generic functions can be modified or
+In a similar way, the behavior of generic functions can be modified or
 overridden by creating a new class that inherits from the standard
 generic function class @code{<generic>}, writing appropriate methods
 that are specialized to the new class, and creating new generic
@@ -1907,7 +1907,7 @@ of that class.
 
 Such is the power of the MOP.  Note that @code{initialize} is just one
 of a large number of generic functions that can be customized to modify
-the behaviour of application objects and classes and of GOOPS itself.
+the behavior of application objects and classes and of GOOPS itself.
 Each following section covers a particular area of GOOPS functionality,
 and describes the generic functions that are relevant for customization
 of that area.
@@ -2419,7 +2419,7 @@ If the metaclass of the new class is something more specialized than the
 default @code{<class>}, then the type of @var{class} in the calls above
 is more specialized than @code{<class>}, and hence it becomes possible
 to define generic function methods, specialized for the new class's
-metaclass, that can modify or override the default behaviour of
+metaclass, that can modify or override the default behavior of
 @code{initialize}, @code{compute-cpl} or @code{compute-get-n-set}.
 
 @code{compute-cpl} computes the class precedence list (``CPL'') for the
@@ -2508,9 +2508,9 @@ standard @code{initialize} method for classes whose metaclass is
 @code{<class>}.  But @code{initialize} itself can also be modified, by
 defining an @code{initialize} method specialized to the new class's
 metaclass.  Such a method could complete override the standard
-behaviour, by not calling @code{(next-method)} at all, but more
+behavior, by not calling @code{(next-method)} at all, but more
 typically it would perform additional class initialization steps before
-and/or after calling @code{(next-method)} for the standard behaviour.
+and/or after calling @code{(next-method)} for the standard behavior.
 
 
 @node Method Definition
@@ -2759,7 +2759,7 @@ make}).  What then happens if @code{<my-class>} is redefined by calling
 
 @menu
 * Redefinable Classes::
-* Default Class Redefinition Behaviour::
+* Default Class Redefinition Behavior::
 * Customizing Class Redefinition::
 @end menu
 
@@ -2794,8 +2794,8 @@ theory.  In practice, attempting to, for example, redefine
 Still, redefinition is an interesting capability when building
 long-lived resilient systems, so GOOPS does offer this facility.
 
-@node Default Class Redefinition Behaviour
-@subsection Default Class Redefinition Behaviour
+@node Default Class Redefinition Behavior
+@subsection Default Class Redefinition Behavior
 
 When a class is defined using @code{define-class} and the class name was
 previously defined, by default the new binding just replaces the old
@@ -2849,11 +2849,11 @@ updated when a class is redefined.)
 @end itemize
 
 If this class redefinition strategy strikes you as rather counter-intuitive,
-bear in mind that it is derived from similar behaviour in other object
+bear in mind that it is derived from similar behavior in other object
 systems such as CLOS, and that experience in those systems has shown it to be
 very useful in practice.
 
-Also bear in mind that, like most of GOOPS' default behaviour, it can
+Also bear in mind that, like most of GOOPS' default behavior, it can
 be customized@dots{}
 
 @node Customizing Class Redefinition
@@ -2864,7 +2864,7 @@ constructs the new class metaobject as usual, then invokes the
 @code{class-redefinition} generic function with the old and new classes
 as arguments.  Therefore, if the old or new classes have metaclasses
 other than the default @code{<redefinable-class>}, class redefinition
-behaviour can be customized by defining a @code{class-redefinition}
+behavior can be customized by defining a @code{class-redefinition}
 method that is specialized for the relevant metaclasses.
 
 @deffn generic class-redefinition
@@ -2880,8 +2880,8 @@ classes.  @xref{Redefinable Classes}.  This default method just returns
 @end deffn
 
 @deffn method class-redefinition (old <redefinable-class>) (new <redefinable-class>)
-This method implements GOOPS' default class redefinition behaviour, as
-described in @ref{Default Class Redefinition Behaviour}.  Returns the
+This method implements GOOPS' default class redefinition behavior, as
+described in @ref{Default Class Redefinition Behavior}.  Returns the
 metaobject for the new class definition.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -2980,6 +2980,6 @@ instance whose class has just been changed.  The default
 @code{update-instance-for-different-class} method does nothing.
 @end deffn
 
-Customized change of class behaviour can be implemented by defining
+Customized change of class behavior can be implemented by defining
 @code{change-class} methods that are specialized either by the class
 of the instances to be modified or by the metaclass of the new class.
diff --git a/doc/ref/misc-modules.texi b/doc/ref/misc-modules.texi
index 9e99e610c..a6999466c 100644
--- a/doc/ref/misc-modules.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/misc-modules.texi
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ into @var{width} characters. By default, @var{obj} will be printed using
 @code{write}, though that behavior can be overridden via the
 @var{display?} keyword argument.
 
-The default behaviour is to print depth-first, meaning that the entire
+The default behavior is to print depth-first, meaning that the entire
 remaining width will be available to each sub-expression of @var{obj} --
 e.g., if @var{obj} is a vector, each member of @var{obj}. One can attempt to
 ``ration'' the available width, trying to allocate it equally to each
diff --git a/doc/ref/posix.texi b/doc/ref/posix.texi
index fec42d061..15f8db1d1 100644
--- a/doc/ref/posix.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/posix.texi
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ environment, setting the revealed count is not required provided the
 port is kept open (i.e., is pointed to by a live Scheme binding) while
 the file descriptor is in use.
 
-To correspond with traditional Unix behaviour, three file descriptors
+To correspond with traditional Unix behavior, three file descriptors
 (0, 1, and 2) are automatically imported when a program starts up and
 assigned to the initial values of the current/standard input, output,
 and error ports, respectively.  The revealed count for each is
@@ -414,7 +414,7 @@ descriptor underlying @var{port}, with mode string @var{modes}
 as for @ref{File Ports, open-file}.  The two ports
 will share a file position and file status flags.
 
-Unexpected behaviour can result if both ports are subsequently used
+Unexpected behavior can result if both ports are subsequently used
 and the original and/or duplicate ports are buffered.
 The mode string can include @code{0} to obtain an unbuffered duplicate
 port.
@@ -432,7 +432,7 @@ and file status flags.
 
 The return value is unspecified.
 
-Unexpected behaviour can result if both ports are subsequently used
+Unexpected behavior can result if both ports are subsequently used
 and the original and/or duplicate ports are buffered.
 
 This procedure does not have any side effects on other ports or
@@ -1286,7 +1286,7 @@ stream.  Otherwise, close the stream.  The @code{setpwent} and
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} getpw [user]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_getpwuid (user)
 Look up an entry in the user database.  @var{user} can be an integer,
-a string, or omitted, giving the behaviour of getpwuid, getpwnam
+a string, or omitted, giving the behavior of getpwuid, getpwnam
 or getpwent respectively.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1341,7 +1341,7 @@ stream.  Otherwise, close the stream.  The @code{setgrent} and
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} getgr [group]
 @deffnx {C Function} scm_getgrgid (group)
 Look up an entry in the group database.  @var{group} can be an integer,
-a string, or omitted, giving the behaviour of getgrgid, getgrnam
+a string, or omitted, giving the behavior of getgrgid, getgrnam
 or getgrent respectively.
 @end deffn
 
@@ -1855,7 +1855,7 @@ has terminated or (optionally) stopped.  Normally it will
 suspend the calling process until this can be done.  If more than one
 child process is eligible then one will be chosen by the operating system.
 
-The value of @var{pid} determines the behaviour:
+The value of @var{pid} determines the behavior:
 
 @table @asis
 @item @var{pid} greater than 0
diff --git a/doc/ref/repl-modules.texi b/doc/ref/repl-modules.texi
index e20393ba2..b64686c9a 100644
--- a/doc/ref/repl-modules.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/repl-modules.texi
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ history entries.
 
 @menu
 * Loading Readline Support::    How to load readline support into Guile.
-* Readline Options::            How to modify readline's behaviour.
+* Readline Options::            How to modify readline's behavior.
 * Readline Functions::          Programming with readline.
 @end menu
 
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ activate readline's features for the REPL.  If you plan to use this
 module often, you should save these to lines to your @file{.guile}
 personal startup file.
 
-You will notice that the REPL's behaviour changes a bit when you have
+You will notice that the REPL's behavior changes a bit when you have
 loaded the readline module.  For example, when you press Enter before
 typing in the closing parentheses of a list, you will see the
 @dfn{continuation} prompt, three dots: @code{...}  This gives you a nice
diff --git a/doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi b/doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi
index 9cd2f9b9c..c05f8ed7d 100644
--- a/doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/scheme-ideas.texi
@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ value to the more convenient name @code{call/cc}.
 Let's understand exactly how this works.  The definition creates a new
 variable @code{call/cc}, and then sets its value to the value of the
 variable @code{call-with-current-continuation}; the latter value is a
-procedure that implements the behaviour that R5RS specifies under the
+procedure that implements the behavior that R5RS specifies under the
 name ``call-with-current-continuation''.  So @code{call/cc} ends up
 holding this value as well.
 
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ value is a procedure.  Most commonly, however, @var{procedure} is simply
 the name of a variable whose value is a procedure.
 
 For example, @code{string-append} is a standard Scheme procedure whose
-behaviour is to concatenate together all the arguments, which are
+behavior is to concatenate together all the arguments, which are
 expected to be strings, that it is given.  So the expression
 
 @lisp
@@ -359,7 +359,7 @@ For example, the value of the following Scheme expression
 
 @noindent
 is a newly created procedure that takes two arguments:  @code{name} and
-@code{address}.  The behaviour of the new procedure is determined by the
+@code{address}.  The behavior of the new procedure is determined by the
 sequence of expressions and definitions in the @var{body} of the
 procedure definition.  (Typically, @var{body} would use the arguments in
 some way, or else there wouldn't be any point in giving them to the
@@ -511,7 +511,7 @@ program as a whole.
 This section clarifies what we mean by an expression's value, by
 introducing the idea of @dfn{evaluation}.  It discusses the side effects
 that evaluation can have, explains how each of the various types of
-Scheme expression is evaluated, and describes the behaviour and use of
+Scheme expression is evaluated, and describes the behavior and use of
 the Guile REPL as a mechanism for exploring evaluation.  The section
 concludes with a very brief summary of Scheme's common syntactic
 expressions.
@@ -549,7 +549,7 @@ values, or side effects, or both.
 It is tempting to try to define more intuitively what we mean by
 ``value'' and ``side effects'', and what the difference between them is.
 In general, though, this is extremely difficult.  It is also
-unnecessary; instead, we can quite happily define the behaviour of a
+unnecessary; instead, we can quite happily define the behavior of a
 Scheme program by specifying how Scheme executes a program as a whole,
 and then by describing the value and side effects of evaluation for each
 type of expression individually.
@@ -718,7 +718,7 @@ In the outermost expression, @var{procedure} is @code{string-length} and
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
 Evaluation of @code{string-length}, which is a variable, gives a
-procedure value that implements the expected behaviour for
+procedure value that implements the expected behavior for
 ``string-length''.
 
 @item
@@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ another procedure invocation expression, means evaluating each of
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
 @code{string-append}, which gives a procedure value that implements the
-expected behaviour for ``string-append''
+expected behavior for ``string-append''
 
 @item
 @code{"/home"}, which gives the string value @code{"/home"}
@@ -920,7 +920,7 @@ execute, Guile enters its standard Read Evaluate Print Loop --- or
 Scheme expression that the user types, evaluates it, and prints the
 resulting value.
 
-The REPL is a useful mechanism for exploring the evaluation behaviour
+The REPL is a useful mechanism for exploring the evaluation behavior
 described in the previous subsection.  If you type @code{string-append},
 for example, the REPL replies @code{#<primitive-procedure
 string-append>}, illustrating the relationship between the variable
@@ -1220,7 +1220,7 @@ of the code that calls @code{currency-string} rebinds the name
 ``currency-abbreviation'' in the meanwhile.
 
 The second function @code{french-currency-string} works precisely by
-taking advantage of this behaviour.  It creates a new binding for the
+taking advantage of this behavior.  It creates a new binding for the
 name ``currency-abbreviation'' which overrides the one established by
 the @code{defvar} form.
 
@@ -1267,7 +1267,7 @@ the name ``currency-abbreviation'' at all, the binding is pointless.
 "USD33.44"
 @end lisp
 
-This begs the question of how the Emacs Lisp behaviour can be
+This begs the question of how the Emacs Lisp behavior can be
 implemented in Scheme.  In general, this is a design question whose
 answer depends upon the problem that is being addressed.  In this case,
 the best answer may be that @code{currency-string} should be
diff --git a/doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi b/doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi
index 221c8ba20..da6bc377c 100644
--- a/doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/scheme-scripts.texi
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ procedure to call after loading the script, Guile will call that
 procedure with @code{(command-line)} as its argument.  So a script that
 uses @code{-e} doesn't need to refer explicitly to @code{command-line}
 in its code.  For example, the script above would have identical
-behaviour if it was written instead like this:
+behavior if it was written instead like this:
 
 @example
 #! /usr/local/bin/guile \
diff --git a/doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi b/doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi
index 09b591e89..efb9ccca4 100644
--- a/doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi
+++ b/doc/ref/srfi-modules.texi
@@ -2139,7 +2139,7 @@ Guile provides a set of primitives and SRFI-18 is one of the systems built in te
 * SRFI-18 Mutexes::             Mutual exclusion devices
 * SRFI-18 Condition variables:: Synchronizing of groups of threads
 * SRFI-18 Time::                Representation of times and durations
-* SRFI-18 Exceptions::          Signalling and handling errors
+* SRFI-18 Exceptions::          Signaling and handling errors
 @end menu
 
 @node SRFI-18 Threads
@@ -3065,7 +3065,7 @@ specialization of @code{write}, sending output to
 The special symbol @code{<>} indicates a slot to be filled by an
 argument to the new procedure.  @code{my-output-port} on the other
 hand is an expression to be evaluated and passed, ie.@: it specializes
-the behaviour of @code{write}.
+the behavior of @code{write}.
 
 @table @nicode
 @item <>
@@ -6094,7 +6094,7 @@ These functions are in the @code{(srfi srfi-171 meta)} module and are only
 usable when you want to write your own transducers.
 
 @deffn {Scheme Procedure} reduced value
-Wraps a value in a @code{<reduced>} container, signalling that the
+Wraps a value in a @code{<reduced>} container, signaling that the
 reduction should stop.
 @end deffn
 
diff --git a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch
index 779ad766e..c00cc2b23 100644
--- a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch
+++ b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/dynamic.sch
@@ -884,7 +884,7 @@
   ; uses union/find elements with two info fields
   ; a type variable has exactly four fields:
   ; car:     TVar (the parent field; initially null)
-  ; cadr:    Number (the rank field; is always nonnegative)
+  ; cadr:    Number (the rank field; is always non-negative)
   ; caddr:   Symbol (the type variable identifier; used only for printing)
   ; cdddr:   Type (the leq field; initially null)
   (gen-element (cons (gen-id) '())))
diff --git a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch
index ee7b80f06..e2407900c 100644
--- a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch
+++ b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit-input-long.sch
@@ -16067,7 +16067,7 @@
 ; Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define (asm:lsh m n)
   (if (not (bytevector? m))
@@ -16098,7 +16098,7 @@
 ; Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define (asm:rshl m n)
   (if (not (bytevector? m))
@@ -16129,7 +16129,7 @@
 ; high end.  Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define asm:rsha
   (let ((ones (asm:bv #xff #xff #xff #xff)))
@@ -16240,7 +16240,7 @@
 
 ; Extract the n low-order bits of m.
 ; m may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; n must be an exact nonnegative integer, interpreted modulo 32.
+; n must be an exact non-negative integer, interpreted modulo 32.
 ; Returns length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; Does not depend on endian-ness.
@@ -16255,7 +16255,7 @@
 
 ; Extract the n high-order bits of m.
 ; m may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; n must be an exact nonnegative integer, interpreted modulo 33.
+; n must be an exact non-negative integer, interpreted modulo 33.
 ; Returns length-4 bytevector with the high-order bits of m at low end.
 ;
 ; Does not depend on endian-ness.
@@ -16553,7 +16553,7 @@
 ;
 ;  version          a fixnum (constant) - heap type version number
 ;  roots            an assoc list that maps root names to values
-;  top              an exact nonnegative integer: the address of the 
+;  top              an exact non-negative integer: the address of the
 ;                   next byte to be emitted
 ;  symbol-table     a symbol table abstract data type
 ;  extra            any value - a client-extension field
@@ -20735,7 +20735,7 @@
 
 ; Strings
 
-; RESULT must have nonnegative fixnum.
+; RESULT must have non-negative fixnum.
 ; RS2 must have character.
 
 (define-primop 'make-string
@@ -23056,7 +23056,7 @@
 ; A `decoded-instruction' is a list where the car is a mnemonic and
 ; the operands are appropriate for that mnemonic.
 ;
-; A `mnemonic' is an exact nonnegative integer.  It encodes the name of
+; A `mnemonic' is an exact non-negative integer.  It encodes the name of
 ; the instruction as well as its attributes (operand pattern and instruction
 ; type).  See below for specific operations on mnemonics.
 
diff --git a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch
index 1cb7834d2..f5e59a027 100644
--- a/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch
+++ b/gc-benchmarks/larceny/twobit.sch
@@ -16067,7 +16067,7 @@
 ; Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define (asm:lsh m n)
   (if (not (bytevector? m))
@@ -16098,7 +16098,7 @@
 ; Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define (asm:rshl m n)
   (if (not (bytevector? m))
@@ -16129,7 +16129,7 @@
 ; high end.  Returns a length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; M may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; N must be an exact nonnegative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
+; N must be an exact non-negative integer; it's interpreted modulo 33.
 
 (define asm:rsha
   (let ((ones (asm:bv #xff #xff #xff #xff)))
@@ -16240,7 +16240,7 @@
 
 ; Extract the n low-order bits of m.
 ; m may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; n must be an exact nonnegative integer, interpreted modulo 32.
+; n must be an exact non-negative integer, interpreted modulo 32.
 ; Returns length-4 bytevector.
 ;
 ; Does not depend on endian-ness.
@@ -16255,7 +16255,7 @@
 
 ; Extract the n high-order bits of m.
 ; m may be an exact integer or a length-4 bytevector.
-; n must be an exact nonnegative integer, interpreted modulo 33.
+; n must be an exact non-negative integer, interpreted modulo 33.
 ; Returns length-4 bytevector with the high-order bits of m at low end.
 ;
 ; Does not depend on endian-ness.
@@ -16553,7 +16553,7 @@
 ;
 ;  version          a fixnum (constant) - heap type version number
 ;  roots            an assoc list that maps root names to values
-;  top              an exact nonnegative integer: the address of the 
+;  top              an exact non-negative integer: the address of the
 ;                   next byte to be emitted
 ;  symbol-table     a symbol table abstract data type
 ;  extra            any value - a client-extension field
@@ -20735,7 +20735,7 @@
 
 ; Strings
 
-; RESULT must have nonnegative fixnum.
+; RESULT must have non-negative fixnum.
 ; RS2 must have character.
 
 (define-primop 'make-string
@@ -23056,7 +23056,7 @@
 ; A `decoded-instruction' is a list where the car is a mnemonic and
 ; the operands are appropriate for that mnemonic.
 ;
-; A `mnemonic' is an exact nonnegative integer.  It encodes the name of
+; A `mnemonic' is an exact non-negative integer.  It encodes the name of
 ; the instruction as well as its attributes (operand pattern and instruction
 ; type).  See below for specific operations on mnemonics.
 
diff --git a/lib/alloca.in.h b/lib/alloca.in.h
index a1bb3d758..a4c3e8df3 100644
--- a/lib/alloca.in.h
+++ b/lib/alloca.in.h
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
 /* alloca (N) returns a pointer to N bytes of memory
    allocated on the stack, which will last until the function returns.
    Use of alloca should be avoided:
-     - inside arguments of function calls - undefined behaviour,
+     - inside arguments of function calls - undefined behavior,
      - in inline functions - the allocation may actually last until the
        calling function returns,
      - for huge N (say, N >= 65536) - you never know how large (or small)
diff --git a/lib/c-ctype.h b/lib/c-ctype.h
index 35ca83d7d..ea538759b 100644
--- a/lib/c-ctype.h
+++ b/lib/c-ctype.h
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 
    These functions work like the corresponding functions in <ctype.h>,
    except that they have the C (POSIX) locale hardwired, whereas the
-   <ctype.h> functions' behaviour depends on the current locale set via
+   <ctype.h> functions' behavior depends on the current locale set via
    setlocale.
 
    Copyright (C) 2000-2003, 2006, 2008-2023 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
diff --git a/lib/malloca.h b/lib/malloca.h
index 325c72771..019cac3ce 100644
--- a/lib/malloca.h
+++ b/lib/malloca.h
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ extern "C" {
    memory allocated on the stack, that lasts until the function returns,
    or NULL.
    Use of safe_alloca should be avoided:
-     - inside arguments of function calls - undefined behaviour,
+     - inside arguments of function calls - undefined behavior,
      - in inline functions - the allocation may actually last until the
        calling function returns.
 */
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ extern void *mmalloca (size_t n)
 
 /* nmalloca(N,S) is an overflow-safe variant of malloca (N * S).
    It allocates an array of N objects, each with S bytes of memory,
-   on the stack.  N and S should be nonnegative and free of side effects.
+   on the stack.  N and S should be non-negative and free of side effects.
    The array must be freed using freea() before the function returns.  */
 #define nmalloca(n, s) \
   (xalloc_oversized (n, s) ? NULL : malloca ((n) * (size_t) (s)))
diff --git a/lib/nstrftime.c b/lib/nstrftime.c
index 68bb56091..270b77762 100644
--- a/lib/nstrftime.c
+++ b/lib/nstrftime.c
@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ static int iso_week_days (int, int);
 static __inline int
 iso_week_days (int yday, int wday)
 {
-  /* Add enough to the first operand of % to make it nonnegative.  */
+  /* Add enough to the first operand of % to make it non-negative.  */
   int big_enough_multiple_of_7 = (-YDAY_MINIMUM / 7 + 2) * 7;
   return (yday
           - (yday - wday + ISO_WEEK1_WDAY + big_enough_multiple_of_7) % 7
diff --git a/lib/verify.h b/lib/verify.h
index b63cb2643..e28d40e63 100644
--- a/lib/verify.h
+++ b/lib/verify.h
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@
    * The first step is ((R) ? 1 : -1).  Given an expression R, of
      integral or boolean or floating-point type, this yields an
      expression of integral type, whose value is later verified to be
-     constant and nonnegative.
+     constant and non-negative.
 
    * Next this expression W is wrapped in a type
      struct _gl_verify_type {
diff --git a/lib/xalloc-oversized.h b/lib/xalloc-oversized.h
index 5dbdfb550..9a08b52fb 100644
--- a/lib/xalloc-oversized.h
+++ b/lib/xalloc-oversized.h
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
 #include <stdint.h>
 
 /* True if N * S does not fit into both ptrdiff_t and size_t.
-   N and S should be nonnegative and free of side effects.
+   N and S should be non-negative and free of side effects.
    This expands to a constant expression if N and S are both constants.
    By gnulib convention, SIZE_MAX represents overflow in size_t
    calculations, so the conservative size_t-based dividend to use here
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
    cannot exist reliably because its total size in bytes would exceed
    MIN (PTRDIFF_MAX, SIZE_MAX - 1).
 
-   N and S should be nonnegative and free of side effects.
+   N and S should be non-negative and free of side effects.
 
    Warning: (xalloc_oversized (N, S) ? NULL : malloc (N * S)) can
    misbehave if N and S are both narrower than ptrdiff_t and size_t,
diff --git a/libguile/gc.h b/libguile/gc.h
index 387f78a7d..fcba9ef45 100644
--- a/libguile/gc.h
+++ b/libguile/gc.h
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ scm_double_cell (scm_t_bits car, scm_t_bits cbr,
      advantage of strict C aliasing rules which say that it's OK to
      interchange the initialization above and the one below when the
      pointer types appear to differ sufficiently.  We don't want that,
-     of course.  GCC allows this behaviour to be disabled with the
+     of course.  GCC allows this behavior to be disabled with the
      -fno-strict-aliasing option, but would also need to be supplied
      by Guile users.  Instead, the following statements prevent the
      reordering.
@@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ scm_words (scm_t_bits car, uint32_t n_words)
      advantage of strict C aliasing rules which say that it's OK to
      interchange the initialization above and the one below when the
      pointer types appear to differ sufficiently.  We don't want that,
-     of course.  GCC allows this behaviour to be disabled with the
+     of course.  GCC allows this behavior to be disabled with the
      -fno-strict-aliasing option, but would also need to be supplied
      by Guile users.  Instead, the following statements prevent the
      reordering.
diff --git a/libguile/ioext.c b/libguile/ioext.c
index d08b68df3..8f5691184 100644
--- a/libguile/ioext.c
+++ b/libguile/ioext.c
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ SCM_DEFINE (scm_redirect_port, "redirect-port", 2, 0, 0,
 	    "After the redirection the two ports will share a file position\n"
 	    "and file status flags.\n\n"
 	    "The return value is unspecified.\n\n"
-	    "Unexpected behaviour can result if both ports are subsequently used\n"
+	    "Unexpected behavior can result if both ports are subsequently used\n"
 	    "and the original and/or duplicate ports are buffered.\n\n"
 	    "This procedure does not have any side effects on other ports or\n"
 	    "revealed counts.")
diff --git a/libguile/list.c b/libguile/list.c
index cd05e77b8..8063a15d1 100644
--- a/libguile/list.c
+++ b/libguile/list.c
@@ -308,7 +308,7 @@ SCM_DEFINE (scm_append_x, "append!", 0, 0, 1,
 
 SCM_DEFINE (scm_last_pair, "last-pair", 1, 0, 0, 
            (SCM lst),
-	    "Return the last pair in @var{lst}, signalling an error if\n"
+	    "Return the last pair in @var{lst}, signaling an error if\n"
 	    "@var{lst} is circular.")
 #define FUNC_NAME s_scm_last_pair
 {
diff --git a/libguile/options.c b/libguile/options.c
index 8241ad8ec..937fd4f3b 100644
--- a/libguile/options.c
+++ b/libguile/options.c
@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@
  * Some definitions:
  *
  * Run time options in Guile are arranged in groups.  Each group
- * affects a certain aspect of the behaviour of the library.
+ * affects a certain aspect of the behavior of the library.
  *
  * An "options interface procedure" manages one group of options.  It
  * can be used to check or set options, or to get documentation for
diff --git a/libguile/posix.c b/libguile/posix.c
index f7d68200b..f6f1681b4 100644
--- a/libguile/posix.c
+++ b/libguile/posix.c
@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ SCM_DEFINE (scm_setgroups, "setgroups", 1, 0, 0,
 SCM_DEFINE (scm_getpwuid, "getpw", 0, 1, 0,
             (SCM user),
 	    "Look up an entry in the user database.  @var{user} can be an\n"
-	    "integer, a string, or omitted, giving the behaviour of\n"
+	    "integer, a string, or omitted, giving the behavior of\n"
 	    "@code{getpwuid}, @code{getpwnam} or @code{getpwent}\n"
 	    "respectively.")
 #define FUNC_NAME s_scm_getpwuid
@@ -459,7 +459,7 @@ SCM_DEFINE (scm_setpwent, "setpw", 0, 1, 0,
 SCM_DEFINE (scm_getgrgid, "getgr", 0, 1, 0,
             (SCM name),
 	    "Look up an entry in the group database.  @var{name} can be an\n"
-	    "integer, a string, or omitted, giving the behaviour of\n"
+	    "integer, a string, or omitted, giving the behavior of\n"
 	    "@code{getgrgid}, @code{getgrnam} or @code{getgrent}\n"
 	    "respectively.")
 #define FUNC_NAME s_scm_getgrgid
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ SCM_DEFINE (scm_waitpid, "waitpid", 1, 1, 0,
 	    "has terminated or (optionally) stopped.  Normally it will\n"
 	    "suspend the calling process until this can be done.  If more than one\n"
 	    "child process is eligible then one will be chosen by the operating system.\n\n"
-	    "The value of @var{pid} determines the behaviour:\n\n"
+	    "The value of @var{pid} determines the behavior:\n\n"
 	    "@table @r\n"
 	    "@item @var{pid} greater than 0\n"
 	    "Request status information from the specified child process.\n"
diff --git a/libguile/threads.c b/libguile/threads.c
index e2bdd7007..bdc4f3415 100644
--- a/libguile/threads.c
+++ b/libguile/threads.c
@@ -902,7 +902,7 @@ enum scm_mutex_kind {
   /* An unowned mutex is like a standard mutex, except that it can be
      unlocked by any thread.  A corrolary of this behavior is that a
      thread's attempt to lock a mutex that it already owns will block
-     instead of signalling an error, as it could be that some other
+     instead of signaling an error, as it could be that some other
      thread unlocks the mutex, allowing the owner thread to proceed.
      This kind of mutex is a bit strange and is here for use by
      SRFI-18.  */
diff --git a/module/ice-9/boot-9.scm b/module/ice-9/boot-9.scm
index a5f2eea9b..378ae2457 100644
--- a/module/ice-9/boot-9.scm
+++ b/module/ice-9/boot-9.scm
@@ -2750,8 +2750,8 @@ are not themselves bound to a defined value."
 
 (define (module-symbol-local-binding m v . opt-val)
   "Return the binding of variable V specified by name within module M,
-signalling an error if the variable is unbound.  If the OPT-VALUE is
-passed, then instead of signalling an error, return OPT-VALUE."
+signaling an error if the variable is unbound.  If the OPT-VALUE is
+passed, then instead of signaling an error, return OPT-VALUE."
   (let ((var (module-local-variable m v)))
     (if (and var (variable-bound? var))
         (variable-ref var)
@@ -2761,8 +2761,8 @@ passed, then instead of signalling an error, return OPT-VALUE."
 
 (define (module-symbol-binding m v . opt-val)
   "Return the binding of variable V specified by name within module M,
-signalling an error if the variable is unbound.  If the OPT-VALUE is
-passed, then instead of signalling an error, return OPT-VALUE."
+signaling an error if the variable is unbound.  If the OPT-VALUE is
+passed, then instead of signaling an error, return OPT-VALUE."
   (let ((var (module-variable m v)))
     (if (and var (variable-bound? var))
         (variable-ref var)
@@ -3452,7 +3452,7 @@ error if selected binding does not exist in the used module."
        ;; FIXME: Avoid use of `apply'.
        (apply module-autoload! module autoloads)
        (let ((duplicates (or duplicates
-                             ;; Avoid stompling a previously installed
+                             ;; Avoid stomping a previously installed
                              ;; duplicates handlers if possible.
                              (and (not (module-duplicates-handlers module))
                                   ;; Note: If you change this default,
diff --git a/module/ice-9/optargs.scm b/module/ice-9/optargs.scm
index dc4ec9571..11c8636e3 100644
--- a/module/ice-9/optargs.scm
+++ b/module/ice-9/optargs.scm
@@ -196,7 +196,7 @@
 ;;
 ;; lambda* creates a procedure that takes optional arguments. These
 ;; are specified by putting them inside brackets at the end of the
-;; paramater list, but before any dotted rest argument. For example,
+;; parameter list, but before any dotted rest argument. For example,
 ;;   (lambda* (a b #:optional c d . e) '())
 ;; creates a procedure with fixed arguments a and b, optional arguments c
 ;; and d, and rest argument e. If the optional arguments are omitted
diff --git a/module/ice-9/ports.scm b/module/ice-9/ports.scm
index bb05769a3..f6be7e83e 100644
--- a/module/ice-9/ports.scm
+++ b/module/ice-9/ports.scm
@@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ never again be used for a read or write operation."
 
 (define* (call-with-output-file file proc #:key (binary #f) (encoding #f))
   "PROC should be a procedure of one argument, and FILE should be a
-string naming a file.  The behaviour is unspecified if the file
+string naming a file.  The behavior is unspecified if the file
 already exists. These procedures call PROC
 with one argument: the port obtained by opening the named file for
 input or output.  If the file cannot be opened, an error is
diff --git a/module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm b/module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm
index fa0402a18..4bc951ebf 100644
--- a/module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm
+++ b/module/ice-9/pretty-print.scm
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ into @var{width} characters. By default, @var{x} will be printed using
 @code{write}, though that behavior can be overriden via the
 @var{display?} keyword argument.
 
-The default behaviour is to print depth-first, meaning that the entire
+The default behavior is to print depth-first, meaning that the entire
 remaining width will be available to each sub-expression of @var{x} --
 e.g., if @var{x} is a vector, each member of @var{x}. One can attempt to
 \"ration\" the available width, trying to allocate it equally to each
diff --git a/module/ice-9/psyntax.scm b/module/ice-9/psyntax.scm
index 374a3c4b3..2e7939642 100644
--- a/module/ice-9/psyntax.scm
+++ b/module/ice-9/psyntax.scm
@@ -485,7 +485,7 @@
     ;;               (lexical . <var>)               lexical variables
     ;;               (ellipsis . <identifier>)       custom ellipsis
     ;;               (displaced-lexical)             displaced lexicals
-    ;; <level>   ::= <nonnegative integer>
+    ;; <level>   ::= <non-negative integer>
     ;; <var>     ::= variable returned by build-lexical-var
 
     ;; a macro is a user-defined syntactic-form.  a core is a
diff --git a/module/language/elisp/parser.scm b/module/language/elisp/parser.scm
index e83f136bb..a7aeff014 100644
--- a/module/language/elisp/parser.scm
+++ b/module/language/elisp/parser.scm
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@
 
 ;;; For parsing circular structures, we keep track of definitions in a
 ;;; hash-map that maps the id's to their values.  When defining a new
-;;; id, though, we immediatly fill the slot with a promise before
+;;; id, though, we immediately fill the slot with a promise before
 ;;; parsing and setting the real value, because it must already be
 ;;; available at that time in case of a circular reference.  The promise
 ;;; refers to a local variable that will be set when the real value is
diff --git a/module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm b/module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm
index 8418f089a..a581b7f6c 100644
--- a/module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm
+++ b/module/language/tree-il/compile-bytecode.scm
@@ -1124,7 +1124,7 @@ in the frame with for the lambda-case clause @var{clause}."
               (0 
                (emit-load-static-procedure asm dst label))
               (nfree
-               ;; Stage closure in 0 to avoid stompling captured free
+               ;; Stage closure in 0 to avoid stomping captured free
                ;; vars.
                (emit-allocate-closure asm 0 nfree label 1)
                (init-free-vars 0 free-vars env 1 2)
@@ -1148,7 +1148,7 @@ in the frame with for the lambda-case clause @var{clause}."
                          frame-size)))
 
         (($ <primcall> src (? variadic-constructor? name) args)
-         ;; Stage result in 0 to avoid stompling args.
+         ;; Stage result in 0 to avoid stomping args.
          (let ((args (for-args args env)))
            (maybe-emit-source src)
            (match name
diff --git a/module/srfi/srfi-37.scm b/module/srfi/srfi-37.scm
index c34b0d083..9b57ac1c2 100644
--- a/module/srfi/srfi-37.scm
+++ b/module/srfi/srfi-37.scm
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@
 
 (define (build-options-lookup options)
   "Answer an `equal?' Guile hash-table that maps OPTIONS' names back
-to the containing options, signalling an error if a name is
+to the containing options, signaling an error if a name is
 encountered more than once."
   (let ((lookup (make-hash-table (* 2 (length options)))))
     (for-each
diff --git a/module/srfi/srfi-43.scm b/module/srfi/srfi-43.scm
index 18e97cf53..4c94036e3 100644
--- a/module/srfi/srfi-43.scm
+++ b/module/srfi/srfi-43.scm
@@ -546,7 +546,7 @@ left-to-right."
 
 (define vector-count
   (case-lambda
-    "(vector-count pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact nonnegative integer
+    "(vector-count pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact non-negative integer
 
 Count the number of indices i for which (PRED? VEC1[i] VEC2[i] ...)
 returns true, where i is less than the length of the shortest vector
@@ -586,7 +586,7 @@ passed."
 
 (define vector-index
   (case-lambda
-    "(vector-index pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact nonnegative integer or #f
+    "(vector-index pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact non-negative integer or #f
 
 Find and return the index of the first elements in VEC1 VEC2 ... that
 satisfy PRED?.  If no matching element is found by the end of the
@@ -624,7 +624,7 @@ shortest vector, return #f."
 
 (define vector-index-right
   (case-lambda
-    "(vector-index-right pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact nonnegative integer or #f
+    "(vector-index-right pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact non-negative integer or #f
 
 Find and return the index of the last elements in VEC1 VEC2 ... that
 satisfy PRED?, searching from right-to-left.  If no matching element
@@ -662,7 +662,7 @@ is found before the end of the shortest vector, return #f."
 
 (define vector-skip
   (case-lambda
-    "(vector-skip pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact nonnegative integer or #f
+    "(vector-skip pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact non-negative integer or #f
 
 Find and return the index of the first elements in VEC1 VEC2 ... that
 do not satisfy PRED?.  If no matching element is found by the end of
@@ -700,7 +700,7 @@ the shortest vector, return #f."
 
 (define vector-skip-right
   (case-lambda
-    "(vector-skip-right pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact nonnegative integer or #f
+    "(vector-skip-right pred? vec1 vec2 ...) -> exact non-negative integer or #f
 
 Find and return the index of the last elements in VEC1 VEC2 ... that
 do not satisfy PRED?, searching from right-to-left.  If no matching
@@ -748,7 +748,7 @@ element is found before the end of the shortest vector, return #f."
                      ((positive? c) (loop lo i))
                      ((negative? c) (loop (+ i 1) hi)))))))
     (case-lambda
-      "(vector-binary-search vec value cmp [start [end]]) -> exact nonnegative integer or #f
+      "(vector-binary-search vec value cmp [start [end]]) -> exact non-negative integer or #f
 
 Find and return an index of VEC between START and END whose value is
 VALUE using a binary search.  If no matching element is found, return
diff --git a/module/statprof.scm b/module/statprof.scm
index e334c2beb..e18be4842 100644
--- a/module/statprof.scm
+++ b/module/statprof.scm
@@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ than @code{statprof-stop}, @code{#f} otherwise."
   
 ;; Do not call this from statprof internal functions -- user only.
 (define* (statprof-stop #:optional (state (ensure-profiler-state)))
-  "Stop the profiler.@code{}"
+  "Stop the profiler."
   ;; After some head-scratching, I don't *think* I need to mask/unmask
   ;; signals here, but if I'm wrong, please let me know.
   (set-profile-level! state (- (profile-level state) 1))
diff --git a/module/texinfo/reflection.scm b/module/texinfo/reflection.scm
index 4ff11995c..8033eb047 100644
--- a/module/texinfo/reflection.scm
+++ b/module/texinfo/reflection.scm
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
 \f
 ;;; Commentary:
 ;;
-;;Routines to generare @code{stexi} documentation for objects and
+;;Routines to generate @code{stexi} documentation for objects and
 ;;modules.
 ;;
 ;;Note that in this context, an @dfn{object} is just a value associated
diff --git a/test-suite/tests/eval.test b/test-suite/tests/eval.test
index 316153385..5bd2ac21a 100644
--- a/test-suite/tests/eval.test
+++ b/test-suite/tests/eval.test
@@ -476,7 +476,7 @@
     (call-with-stack-overflow-handler 2.0
       trigger-overflow trigger-overflow))
 
-  (pass-if-exception "limit should be nonnegative"
+  (pass-if-exception "limit should be non-negative"
       exception:out-of-range
     (call-with-stack-overflow-handler -1
       trigger-overflow trigger-overflow))
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@
     (call-with-stack-overflow-handler 1000
       trigger-overflow
       (lambda () 2.0)))
-  (pass-if-exception "overflow handler should be nonnegative"
+  (pass-if-exception "overflow handler should be non-negative"
       exception:out-of-range
     (call-with-stack-overflow-handler 1000
       trigger-overflow
diff --git a/test-suite/tests/fluids.test b/test-suite/tests/fluids.test
index 0fc8cbe16..5026c2f30 100644
--- a/test-suite/tests/fluids.test
+++ b/test-suite/tests/fluids.test
@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@
     (gc)
     (fluid? (g))))
 
-(pass-if-exception "fluid-ref* depth must be nonnegative"
+(pass-if-exception "fluid-ref* depth must be non-negative"
     exception:out-of-range
   (fluid-ref* (make-fluid) -1))
 
-- 
2.41.0






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2024-02-01 19:32 bug#68878: [PATCH] Fix typos throughout codebase Morgan Smith

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